Novel genetic tools facilitate the study of cortical neuron migration

Novel genetic tools facilitate the study of cortical neuron migration Key facets of mammalian forebrain cortical development include the radial migration of projection neurons and subsequent cellular differentiation into layer-specific subtypes. Inappropriate regulation of these processes can lead to a number of congenital brain defects in both mouse and human, including lissencephaly and intellectual disability. The genes regulating these processes are still not all identified, suggesting genetic analyses will continue to be a powerful tool in mechanistically studying the development of the cerebral cortex. Reelin is a molecule which we have understood to be critical for proper cortical development for many years. The precise mechanism of Reelin, however, is not fully understood. To address both of these unresolved issues, we report here the creation of a novel conditional allele of the Reelin gene and showcase the use of an Etv1-GFP transgenic line highlighting a subpopulation of the cortex: layer V pyramidal neurons. Together, these represent genetic tools which may facilitate the study of cortical development in a number of different ways. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Novel genetic tools facilitate the study of cortical neuron migration

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-015-9615-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key facets of mammalian forebrain cortical development include the radial migration of projection neurons and subsequent cellular differentiation into layer-specific subtypes. Inappropriate regulation of these processes can lead to a number of congenital brain defects in both mouse and human, including lissencephaly and intellectual disability. The genes regulating these processes are still not all identified, suggesting genetic analyses will continue to be a powerful tool in mechanistically studying the development of the cerebral cortex. Reelin is a molecule which we have understood to be critical for proper cortical development for many years. The precise mechanism of Reelin, however, is not fully understood. To address both of these unresolved issues, we report here the creation of a novel conditional allele of the Reelin gene and showcase the use of an Etv1-GFP transgenic line highlighting a subpopulation of the cortex: layer V pyramidal neurons. Together, these represent genetic tools which may facilitate the study of cortical development in a number of different ways.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 12, 2015

References

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