Nitrogen fixation ability explains leaf chemistry and arbuscular mycorrhizal responses to fertilization

Nitrogen fixation ability explains leaf chemistry and arbuscular mycorrhizal responses to... Atmospheric nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition rates are predicted to drastically increase in the coming decades. The ecosystem level consequences of these increases will depend on how plant tissue nutrient concentrations, stoichiometry and investment in nutrient uptake mechanisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) change in response to increased nutrient availability, and how responses differ between plant functional types. Using a factorial nutrient addition experiment with seedlings of multiple N-fixing and non-N-fixing tree species, we examined whether leaf chemistry and AMF responses differ between these dominant woody plant functional groups of tropical savanna and dry forest ecosystems. We found that N-fixers have remarkably stable foliar chemistry that stays constant with external input of nutrients. Non-N-fixers responded to N and N + P addition by increasing both concentrations and total amounts of foliar N, but showed a corresponding decrease in P concentrations while total amounts of foliar P stayed constant, suggesting a ‘dilution’ of tissue P with increased N availability. Non-N-fixers also showed an increase in N:P ratios with N and N + P addition, probably driven by both an increase in N and a decrease in P concentrations. AMF colonization decreased with N + P addition in non-N-fixers and increased with N and N + P addition in N-fixers, suggesting differences in their nutrient acquisition roles in the two plant functional groups. Our results suggest that N-fixers and non-N-fixers can differ significantly in their responses to N and P deposition, with potential consequences for future nutrient and carbon cycling in savanna and dry forest ecosystems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Ecology Springer Journals

Nitrogen fixation ability explains leaf chemistry and arbuscular mycorrhizal responses to fertilization

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Ecology; Community & Population Ecology; Terrestial Ecology; Applied Ecology; Biodiversity
ISSN
1385-0237
eISSN
1573-5052
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11258-018-0803-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Atmospheric nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition rates are predicted to drastically increase in the coming decades. The ecosystem level consequences of these increases will depend on how plant tissue nutrient concentrations, stoichiometry and investment in nutrient uptake mechanisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) change in response to increased nutrient availability, and how responses differ between plant functional types. Using a factorial nutrient addition experiment with seedlings of multiple N-fixing and non-N-fixing tree species, we examined whether leaf chemistry and AMF responses differ between these dominant woody plant functional groups of tropical savanna and dry forest ecosystems. We found that N-fixers have remarkably stable foliar chemistry that stays constant with external input of nutrients. Non-N-fixers responded to N and N + P addition by increasing both concentrations and total amounts of foliar N, but showed a corresponding decrease in P concentrations while total amounts of foliar P stayed constant, suggesting a ‘dilution’ of tissue P with increased N availability. Non-N-fixers also showed an increase in N:P ratios with N and N + P addition, probably driven by both an increase in N and a decrease in P concentrations. AMF colonization decreased with N + P addition in non-N-fixers and increased with N and N + P addition in N-fixers, suggesting differences in their nutrient acquisition roles in the two plant functional groups. Our results suggest that N-fixers and non-N-fixers can differ significantly in their responses to N and P deposition, with potential consequences for future nutrient and carbon cycling in savanna and dry forest ecosystems.

Journal

Plant EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 2, 2018

References

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