Nitrate leaching from a sub-alpine coniferous forest subjected to experimentally increased N deposition for 20years, and effects of tree girdling and felling

Nitrate leaching from a sub-alpine coniferous forest subjected to experimentally increased N... Increased nitrogen (N) deposition rates were simulated for 20 years (1995–2015) by sprinkling rain water enriched with NH4NO3 (+22 kg ha−1 year−1 N) in a small headwater catchment within a spruce (Picea abies) forest at Alptal (central Switzerland). The added N was labelled with 15NH 4 15 NO3 during the first year. A control catchment was labelled in years 6 and 8. NO3 − leaching doubled in the N-addition catchment during the first year, resulting almost entirely from loss of 15N-labelled NO3 −. The proportion of added N leached as NO3 −–N reached 1/3 after 5 years, then remained stable for the next 10 years, at 6.6–10 kg ha−1 year−1 compared with 1.4–2.9 kg ha−1 year−1 in the control catchment. In each catchment, half of the large trees were girdled during the 15th year and felled 1 year later to assess their role in soil N retention. Girdling and felling resulted in a strong increase in NO3 −–N leaching from the N-addition catchment (up to 19 kg ha−1 year−1). The increase was significantly smaller in the control (up to 4 kg ha−1 year−1). NO3 − leached after tree girdling contained only 0.18% of the originally applied tracer in the control and none detectable in the N-addition catchment. The increased leaching was thus mainly from new N and due to reduced N immobilisation by trees rather than to increased N mineralisation and nitrification in the soil. Dissolved organic N leaching (average 6.1 kg ha−1 year−1), in contrast, was unaffected by the treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biogeochemistry Springer Journals

Nitrate leaching from a sub-alpine coniferous forest subjected to experimentally increased N deposition for 20years, and effects of tree girdling and felling

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/nitrate-leaching-from-a-sub-alpine-coniferous-forest-subjected-to-OIYdm7bcFx
Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Earth Sciences; Biogeosciences; Ecosystems; Environmental Chemistry; Life Sciences, general
ISSN
0168-2563
eISSN
1573-515X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10533-017-0364-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Increased nitrogen (N) deposition rates were simulated for 20 years (1995–2015) by sprinkling rain water enriched with NH4NO3 (+22 kg ha−1 year−1 N) in a small headwater catchment within a spruce (Picea abies) forest at Alptal (central Switzerland). The added N was labelled with 15NH 4 15 NO3 during the first year. A control catchment was labelled in years 6 and 8. NO3 − leaching doubled in the N-addition catchment during the first year, resulting almost entirely from loss of 15N-labelled NO3 −. The proportion of added N leached as NO3 −–N reached 1/3 after 5 years, then remained stable for the next 10 years, at 6.6–10 kg ha−1 year−1 compared with 1.4–2.9 kg ha−1 year−1 in the control catchment. In each catchment, half of the large trees were girdled during the 15th year and felled 1 year later to assess their role in soil N retention. Girdling and felling resulted in a strong increase in NO3 −–N leaching from the N-addition catchment (up to 19 kg ha−1 year−1). The increase was significantly smaller in the control (up to 4 kg ha−1 year−1). NO3 − leached after tree girdling contained only 0.18% of the originally applied tracer in the control and none detectable in the N-addition catchment. The increased leaching was thus mainly from new N and due to reduced N immobilisation by trees rather than to increased N mineralisation and nitrification in the soil. Dissolved organic N leaching (average 6.1 kg ha−1 year−1), in contrast, was unaffected by the treatment.

Journal

BiogeochemistrySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 31, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off