Nicotine deprivation elevates neural representation of smoking-related cues in object-sensitive visual cortex: a proof of concept study

Nicotine deprivation elevates neural representation of smoking-related cues in object-sensitive... Objective In the current study, we use functional magnetic discriminate between patterns of activity elicited by visually resonance imaging (fMRI) and multi-voxel pattern analysis similar smoking-related (cigarettes) and neutral objects (MVPA) to investigate whether tobacco addiction biases basic (pencils) above empirically estimated chance levels only during visual processing in favour of smoking-related images. We deprivation (mean = 61.0%, chance (permutations) = 50.0%, hypothesize that the neural representation of smoking-related p = .01) but not during satiation (mean = 53.5%, chance (per- stimuli in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is elevated after mutations) = 49.9%, ns.). For all other stimulus contrasts, there a period of nicotine deprivation compared to a satiated state, was no difference in discriminability between the deprived and but that this is not the case for object categories unrelated to satiated conditions. smoking. Conclusion The discriminability between smoking and non- Methods Current smokers (≥10 cigarettes a day) underwent smoking visual objects was elevated in object-selective brain two fMRI scanning sessions: one after 10 h of nicotine absti- region LOC after a period of nicotine abstinence. This indicates nence and the other one after smoking ad libitum. Regional that attention bias likely affects basic visual object processing. blood http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychopharmacology Springer Journals

Nicotine deprivation elevates neural representation of smoking-related cues in object-sensitive visual cortex: a proof of concept study

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Psychiatry
ISSN
0033-3158
eISSN
1432-2072
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00213-017-4628-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective In the current study, we use functional magnetic discriminate between patterns of activity elicited by visually resonance imaging (fMRI) and multi-voxel pattern analysis similar smoking-related (cigarettes) and neutral objects (MVPA) to investigate whether tobacco addiction biases basic (pencils) above empirically estimated chance levels only during visual processing in favour of smoking-related images. We deprivation (mean = 61.0%, chance (permutations) = 50.0%, hypothesize that the neural representation of smoking-related p = .01) but not during satiation (mean = 53.5%, chance (per- stimuli in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is elevated after mutations) = 49.9%, ns.). For all other stimulus contrasts, there a period of nicotine deprivation compared to a satiated state, was no difference in discriminability between the deprived and but that this is not the case for object categories unrelated to satiated conditions. smoking. Conclusion The discriminability between smoking and non- Methods Current smokers (≥10 cigarettes a day) underwent smoking visual objects was elevated in object-selective brain two fMRI scanning sessions: one after 10 h of nicotine absti- region LOC after a period of nicotine abstinence. This indicates nence and the other one after smoking ad libitum. Regional that attention bias likely affects basic visual object processing. blood

Journal

PsychopharmacologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 21, 2017

References

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