New use for CETSA: monitoring innate immune receptor stability via post-translational modification by OGT

New use for CETSA: monitoring innate immune receptor stability via post-translational... O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic and functionally diverse post-translational modification shown to affect thousands of proteins, including the innate immune receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (Nod2). Mutations of Nod2 (R702W, G908R and 1007 fs) are associated with Crohn’s disease and have lower stabilities compared to wild type. Cycloheximide (CHX)-chase half-life assays have been used to show that O-GlcNAcylation increases the stability and response of both wild type and Crohn’s variant Nod2, R702W. A more rapid method to assess stability afforded by post-translational modifications is necessary to fully comprehend the correlation between NLR stability and O-GlcNAcylation. Here, a recently developed cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) that is typically used to demonstrate protein-ligand binding was adapted to detect shifts in protein stabilization upon increasing O-GlcNAcylation levels in Nod2. This assay was used as a method to predict if other Crohn’s associated Nod2 variants were O-GlcNAcylated, and also identified the modification on another NLR, Nod1. Classical immunoprecipitations and NF-κB transcriptional assays were used to confirm the presence and effect of this modification on these proteins. The results presented here demonstrate that CETSA is a convenient method that can be used to detect the stability effect of O-GlcNAcylation on O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) client proteins and will be a powerful tool in studying post-translational modification. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes Springer Journals

New use for CETSA: monitoring innate immune receptor stability via post-translational modification by OGT

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Bioorganic Chemistry; Biochemistry, general; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Animal Biochemistry; Organic Chemistry
ISSN
0145-479X
eISSN
1573-6881
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10863-018-9754-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic and functionally diverse post-translational modification shown to affect thousands of proteins, including the innate immune receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (Nod2). Mutations of Nod2 (R702W, G908R and 1007 fs) are associated with Crohn’s disease and have lower stabilities compared to wild type. Cycloheximide (CHX)-chase half-life assays have been used to show that O-GlcNAcylation increases the stability and response of both wild type and Crohn’s variant Nod2, R702W. A more rapid method to assess stability afforded by post-translational modifications is necessary to fully comprehend the correlation between NLR stability and O-GlcNAcylation. Here, a recently developed cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) that is typically used to demonstrate protein-ligand binding was adapted to detect shifts in protein stabilization upon increasing O-GlcNAcylation levels in Nod2. This assay was used as a method to predict if other Crohn’s associated Nod2 variants were O-GlcNAcylated, and also identified the modification on another NLR, Nod1. Classical immunoprecipitations and NF-κB transcriptional assays were used to confirm the presence and effect of this modification on these proteins. The results presented here demonstrate that CETSA is a convenient method that can be used to detect the stability effect of O-GlcNAcylation on O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) client proteins and will be a powerful tool in studying post-translational modification.

Journal

Journal of Bioenergetics and BiomembranesSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 18, 2018

References

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