New evidence of an old problem: The coupling of genome replication to cell growth in bacteria

New evidence of an old problem: The coupling of genome replication to cell growth in bacteria The problem of coordinating genome replication with cell growth in bacteria was posed over four decades ago. Unlike for eukaryotes, this problem has not been completely solved even for Escherichia coli, which has been comprehensively studied by molecular biologists, to say nothing of other bacteria. Current models of the bacterial life cycle solve the coupling problem by introducing a phenomenological hypothesis that considers the dynamic coordination of growth and replication but does not unveil the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we review the mechanisms regulating genome replication initiation with regards to their coupling to growth processes in the three best investigated bacterial species: E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Caulobacter crescentus. A putative correlation between the type of cell growth laws and the actual mechanisms regulating the replication of DNA formed during the process of evolution in various classes of bacteria, is discussed, including those intracellular parasites in which degenerative evolution has discarded most of their genomes. We contemplate the concept of a universal growth law for bacterial cells and some features in the formation of a primitive negative replication regulating mechanism in the context of the coupling problem. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

New evidence of an old problem: The coupling of genome replication to cell growth in bacteria

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/new-evidence-of-an-old-problem-the-coupling-of-genome-replication-to-CtAXjKCg9T
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Microbial Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S102279541408002X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The problem of coordinating genome replication with cell growth in bacteria was posed over four decades ago. Unlike for eukaryotes, this problem has not been completely solved even for Escherichia coli, which has been comprehensively studied by molecular biologists, to say nothing of other bacteria. Current models of the bacterial life cycle solve the coupling problem by introducing a phenomenological hypothesis that considers the dynamic coordination of growth and replication but does not unveil the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we review the mechanisms regulating genome replication initiation with regards to their coupling to growth processes in the three best investigated bacterial species: E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Caulobacter crescentus. A putative correlation between the type of cell growth laws and the actual mechanisms regulating the replication of DNA formed during the process of evolution in various classes of bacteria, is discussed, including those intracellular parasites in which degenerative evolution has discarded most of their genomes. We contemplate the concept of a universal growth law for bacterial cells and some features in the formation of a primitive negative replication regulating mechanism in the context of the coupling problem.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 23, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off