Nest feathering responses by Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to experimental warming

Nest feathering responses by Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to experimental warming Among many functions, bird nests protect eggs, developing young, and incubating adults from inclement weather. In Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), prior to and while females are incubating, males compete with rivals for feathers that they use to line nests. The thermal benefits hypothesis proposes that males add feathers to improve heat retention of nests. We tested this hypothesis on Tree Swallows nesting near Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada in 2013, 2014, and 2015, and in St. Denis, Saskatchewan in 2013. In 2013, at both locations we experimentally heated nests. After young had fledged, we counted and measured feathers in each nest. The hypothesis was not supported. The only significant result was that St. Denis (52.2°N) had fewer feathers than the Annapolis Valley (45.1°N) site, which is contrary to expectation. Our findings challenge the prevailing hypothesis for why male Tree Swallows feather nests. Keywords Artificial heating · Thermal benefits hypothesis · Nest heat retention · Nest microclimate Zusammenfassung Die Ausstattung des Nestes mit Federn als Reaktion auf experimentelle Erwärmung bei Sumpfschwalben (Tachycineta bicolor) Neben vielen anderen Funktionen schützen Vogelnester Gelege und die sich entwickelnden Küken sowie die brütenden Altvögel vor schlechten Witterungsbedingungen. Vor und während der Bebrütung durch die Weibchen konkurrieren die Männc hen http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ornithology Springer Journals

Nest feathering responses by Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to experimental warming

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Dt. Ornithologen-Gesellschaft e.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Ecology; Fish & Wildlife Biology & Management
ISSN
2193-7192
eISSN
2193-7206
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10336-018-1568-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Among many functions, bird nests protect eggs, developing young, and incubating adults from inclement weather. In Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), prior to and while females are incubating, males compete with rivals for feathers that they use to line nests. The thermal benefits hypothesis proposes that males add feathers to improve heat retention of nests. We tested this hypothesis on Tree Swallows nesting near Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada in 2013, 2014, and 2015, and in St. Denis, Saskatchewan in 2013. In 2013, at both locations we experimentally heated nests. After young had fledged, we counted and measured feathers in each nest. The hypothesis was not supported. The only significant result was that St. Denis (52.2°N) had fewer feathers than the Annapolis Valley (45.1°N) site, which is contrary to expectation. Our findings challenge the prevailing hypothesis for why male Tree Swallows feather nests. Keywords Artificial heating · Thermal benefits hypothesis · Nest heat retention · Nest microclimate Zusammenfassung Die Ausstattung des Nestes mit Federn als Reaktion auf experimentelle Erwärmung bei Sumpfschwalben (Tachycineta bicolor) Neben vielen anderen Funktionen schützen Vogelnester Gelege und die sich entwickelnden Küken sowie die brütenden Altvögel vor schlechten Witterungsbedingungen. Vor und während der Bebrütung durch die Weibchen konkurrieren die Männc hen

Journal

Journal of OrnithologySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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