Negative Symptoms, Anger, and Social Support: Response of an Inpatient Sample to News Coverage of the September 11 Terrorist Attacks

Negative Symptoms, Anger, and Social Support: Response of an Inpatient Sample to News Coverage of... We examined the reactions of 17 male inpatients on a secure psychiatric unit to television news coverage of the September 11 attacks. All had psychotic diagnoses. We hypothesized that self-exposure and affective response to the news coverage and use of social support would be influenced by predominance of negative symptoms. Additionally, we examined for the emergence of common stress symptoms and exacerbations of psychosis. Results showed a dose-response relationship between amount of viewing and magnitude of response to the coverage. Anger was the emotion most clearly tied to coverage exposure and the other response variables. A wide range of stress symptoms was reported. Hypotheses concerning the influence of negative symptoms were partially supported. A significant minority of the patients disclosed exacerbation of psychotic symptoms in response to the attacks. Patients who reported a negative emotional reaction were more likely to talk to others about the attacks, but social contact did not predictably lead to affective relief. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Negative Symptoms, Anger, and Social Support: Response of an Inpatient Sample to News Coverage of the September 11 Terrorist Attacks

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1024162420449
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined the reactions of 17 male inpatients on a secure psychiatric unit to television news coverage of the September 11 attacks. All had psychotic diagnoses. We hypothesized that self-exposure and affective response to the news coverage and use of social support would be influenced by predominance of negative symptoms. Additionally, we examined for the emergence of common stress symptoms and exacerbations of psychosis. Results showed a dose-response relationship between amount of viewing and magnitude of response to the coverage. Anger was the emotion most clearly tied to coverage exposure and the other response variables. A wide range of stress symptoms was reported. Hypotheses concerning the influence of negative symptoms were partially supported. A significant minority of the patients disclosed exacerbation of psychotic symptoms in response to the attacks. Patients who reported a negative emotional reaction were more likely to talk to others about the attacks, but social contact did not predictably lead to affective relief.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 28, 2004

References

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