Natural and forced evolution of a counter rotating vortex pair

Natural and forced evolution of a counter rotating vortex pair Naturally occurring instabilities such as the long wave Crow instability are one of the mechanisms that can bring about the break-up of aircraft wake vortex pairs. Encouraging the early onset of such instabilities by active or passive means offers the possibility of accelerating wake break-up and dissipation with favourable consequences in terms of safe aircraft separation and airport capacity. This paper describes an experimental investigation of the evolution of the Crow instability in a counter rotating vortex pair perturbed by a pulsed air sheet. Flow measurements were made using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry and two methods devised to detect wake break-up from the two-dimensional data. Pulsed excitation at a wavelength within the range amplified by the Crow instability resulted in wake break-up and the formation of vortex rings at a downstream distance reduced by up to 37% compared to the baseline case. For excitation at a wavelength outside the excited range early break-up was also observed but the extent of the accelerated break-up was reduced as the amplitude of the excitation was increased. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experiments in Fluids Springer Journals

Natural and forced evolution of a counter rotating vortex pair

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/natural-and-forced-evolution-of-a-counter-rotating-vortex-pair-Q2WwbJeUj8
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Engineering; Engineering Fluid Dynamics; Fluid- and Aerodynamics; Engineering Thermodynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
ISSN
0723-4864
eISSN
1432-1114
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00348-005-0051-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Naturally occurring instabilities such as the long wave Crow instability are one of the mechanisms that can bring about the break-up of aircraft wake vortex pairs. Encouraging the early onset of such instabilities by active or passive means offers the possibility of accelerating wake break-up and dissipation with favourable consequences in terms of safe aircraft separation and airport capacity. This paper describes an experimental investigation of the evolution of the Crow instability in a counter rotating vortex pair perturbed by a pulsed air sheet. Flow measurements were made using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry and two methods devised to detect wake break-up from the two-dimensional data. Pulsed excitation at a wavelength within the range amplified by the Crow instability resulted in wake break-up and the formation of vortex rings at a downstream distance reduced by up to 37% compared to the baseline case. For excitation at a wavelength outside the excited range early break-up was also observed but the extent of the accelerated break-up was reduced as the amplitude of the excitation was increased.

Journal

Experiments in FluidsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 14, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off