Nanosized amorphous tantalum oxide: a highly efficient photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution

Nanosized amorphous tantalum oxide: a highly efficient photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution Keywords Amorphous  Photocatalysis  Ta O  H evolution  Direct x y 2 evaporation method Introduction The global climate problems, such as the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and other air- pollution problems, have become more and more serious. To solve the issue, many researchers have been working on exploring new renewable and clean energy sources [1–4]. Hydrogen (H ) is considered to be one of the potential candidates to replace fossil fuel for our sustainable energy needs, especially if it can be generated from the photocatalytic conversion of cheap and abundant water into clean non- carbon hydrogen from solar energy resources [5–9]. Utilizing solar energy to split water and produce hydrogen using photocatalysts is an ultimate goal for the supply of clean and sustainable energy. Semiconductor catalysts based on d (Ti, Zr, Nb, Ta, and W) transition metal oxides have emerged as candidates for use in photocatalytic systems because of their advantageous electronic configurations [10]. Although these photocatalysts have garnered much interest in academia, there has not been much studies about the influence of atomic arrangement on splitting water. Furthermore, among these semiconductor photocatalyst systems, tantalum-based photocatalysts especially the efficient amorphous ones have been rarely reported. So http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Nanosized amorphous tantalum oxide: a highly efficient photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Catalysis; Physical Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11164-017-3052-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keywords Amorphous  Photocatalysis  Ta O  H evolution  Direct x y 2 evaporation method Introduction The global climate problems, such as the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and other air- pollution problems, have become more and more serious. To solve the issue, many researchers have been working on exploring new renewable and clean energy sources [1–4]. Hydrogen (H ) is considered to be one of the potential candidates to replace fossil fuel for our sustainable energy needs, especially if it can be generated from the photocatalytic conversion of cheap and abundant water into clean non- carbon hydrogen from solar energy resources [5–9]. Utilizing solar energy to split water and produce hydrogen using photocatalysts is an ultimate goal for the supply of clean and sustainable energy. Semiconductor catalysts based on d (Ti, Zr, Nb, Ta, and W) transition metal oxides have emerged as candidates for use in photocatalytic systems because of their advantageous electronic configurations [10]. Although these photocatalysts have garnered much interest in academia, there has not been much studies about the influence of atomic arrangement on splitting water. Furthermore, among these semiconductor photocatalyst systems, tantalum-based photocatalysts especially the efficient amorphous ones have been rarely reported. So

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 29, 2017

References

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