Nanometric thin films of non-doped diamond-like carbon grown on n-type (P-doped) silicon substrates as electrochemical electrodes

Nanometric thin films of non-doped diamond-like carbon grown on n-type (P-doped) silicon... The electrochemical response of thin non-doped diamond-like carbon films grown by pulsed laser deposition onto n-type (P- doped) silicon substrates was studied using different redox-active couples. The experiments were conducted as a function of the film thickness which can be controlled by the deposition time. It could be demonstrated that the film thickness greatly influences the electrochemical response and the electron transference rate at the surface, thus reaching an optimal response for films with a thickness of around 35 nm. This holds true for all redox couples studied. Those films show rather similar properties compared to boron-doped diamond electrodes, thus becoming an interesting coating to be studied as electrochemical electrode. . . . Keywords Diamond-like carbon Thin films Pulsed laser deposition Electrochemical electrodes Introduction glucose, dopamine, and commercial enzyme-linked inmunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits [11–15]. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a type of amorphous carbon Different carbon-based materials have been considered to with a high fraction of sp -bonds having similar properties be an optimal electrode material. Boron-doped diamond can compared to diamond, such as optical transparency, wide band be regarded as an excellent candidate since this material offers gap, mechanical hardness, and chemical inertness [1–4]. DLC outstanding electrochemical properties [16]. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry Springer Journals

Nanometric thin films of non-doped diamond-like carbon grown on n-type (P-doped) silicon substrates as electrochemical electrodes

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Physical Chemistry; Electrochemistry; Energy Storage; Characterization and Evaluation of Materials; Analytical Chemistry; Condensed Matter Physics
ISSN
1432-8488
eISSN
1433-0768
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10008-018-4002-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The electrochemical response of thin non-doped diamond-like carbon films grown by pulsed laser deposition onto n-type (P- doped) silicon substrates was studied using different redox-active couples. The experiments were conducted as a function of the film thickness which can be controlled by the deposition time. It could be demonstrated that the film thickness greatly influences the electrochemical response and the electron transference rate at the surface, thus reaching an optimal response for films with a thickness of around 35 nm. This holds true for all redox couples studied. Those films show rather similar properties compared to boron-doped diamond electrodes, thus becoming an interesting coating to be studied as electrochemical electrode. . . . Keywords Diamond-like carbon Thin films Pulsed laser deposition Electrochemical electrodes Introduction glucose, dopamine, and commercial enzyme-linked inmunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits [11–15]. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a type of amorphous carbon Different carbon-based materials have been considered to with a high fraction of sp -bonds having similar properties be an optimal electrode material. Boron-doped diamond can compared to diamond, such as optical transparency, wide band be regarded as an excellent candidate since this material offers gap, mechanical hardness, and chemical inertness [1–4]. DLC outstanding electrochemical properties [16].

Journal

Journal of Solid State ElectrochemistrySpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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