Na+-Glucose Cotransporter SGLT1 Protein in Salivary Glands: Potential Involvement in the Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Salivary Flow

Na+-Glucose Cotransporter SGLT1 Protein in Salivary Glands: Potential Involvement in the... Oral health complications in diabetes include decreased salivary secretion. The SLC5A1 gene encodes the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 protein, which not only transports glucose, but also acts as a water channel. Since SLC5A1 expression is altered in kidneys of diabetic subjects, we hypothesize that it could also be altered in salivary glands, contributing to diabetic dysfunction. The present study shows a diabetes-induced decrease (p < 0.001) in salivary secretion, which was accompanied by enhanced (p < 0.05) SGLT1 mRNA expression in parotid (50%) and submandibular (30%) glands. Immunohistochemical analysis of parotid gland of diabetic rats revealed that SGLT1 protein expression increased in the luminal membrane of ductal cells, which can stimulate water reabsorption from primary saliva. Furthermore, SGLT1 protein was reduced in myoepithelial cells of the parotid from diabetic animals, and that, by reducing cellular contractile activity, might also be related to reduced salivary flux. Six-day insulin-treated diabetic rats reversed all alterations. In conclusion, diabetes increases SLC5A1 gene expression in salivary glands, increasing the SGLT1 protein content in the luminal membrane of ductal cells, which, by increasing water reabsorption, might explain the diabetes-induced decrease in salivary secretion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Na+-Glucose Cotransporter SGLT1 Protein in Salivary Glands: Potential Involvement in the Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Salivary Flow

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Human Physiology ; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-009-9159-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Oral health complications in diabetes include decreased salivary secretion. The SLC5A1 gene encodes the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 protein, which not only transports glucose, but also acts as a water channel. Since SLC5A1 expression is altered in kidneys of diabetic subjects, we hypothesize that it could also be altered in salivary glands, contributing to diabetic dysfunction. The present study shows a diabetes-induced decrease (p < 0.001) in salivary secretion, which was accompanied by enhanced (p < 0.05) SGLT1 mRNA expression in parotid (50%) and submandibular (30%) glands. Immunohistochemical analysis of parotid gland of diabetic rats revealed that SGLT1 protein expression increased in the luminal membrane of ductal cells, which can stimulate water reabsorption from primary saliva. Furthermore, SGLT1 protein was reduced in myoepithelial cells of the parotid from diabetic animals, and that, by reducing cellular contractile activity, might also be related to reduced salivary flux. Six-day insulin-treated diabetic rats reversed all alterations. In conclusion, diabetes increases SLC5A1 gene expression in salivary glands, increasing the SGLT1 protein content in the luminal membrane of ductal cells, which, by increasing water reabsorption, might explain the diabetes-induced decrease in salivary secretion.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 24, 2009

References

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