Mycophenolate-mofetil/tacrolimus

Mycophenolate-mofetil/tacrolimus Reactions 1704, p276 - 2 Jun 2018 Trichodysplasia spinulosa: case report An elderly woman in her early 70s [age at the time of reaction onset not stated] developed trichodysplasia spinulosa during treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus [routes and duration of treatments to reaction onset not stated]. The woman presented with a one-year history of facial rash on the cheeks and eyebrows at the age of 72 years. The rash then spread to the chin, nose and the upper trunk. The lesions appeared mildly pruritic. She had a significant history of end stage renal failure, after which, she had undergone a cadaveric renal transplantation two years prior. She was prescribed immunosuppressant therapy with tacrolimus 8mg twice a day and mycophenolate-mofetil 200mg twice a day. A clinical examination demonstrated multiple flesh-coloured follicular papules and keratin spines against an erythematous background. Thereafter, the woman was ineffectively treated with clobetasone or ivermectin. A diagnostic skin biopsy of the right ear showed dilatation and keratotic plugging of the hair infundibula along with significant expansion and dystrophy of the inner root sheath. Immunohistochemistry test was positive for SV40 polyoma virus. These findings were suggestive of trichodysplasia spinulosa [outcome not stated]. Author comment: "We present a rare case of trichodysplasia spinulosa against a background of long-term immunosuppression as a result of renal transplantation." "Trichodysplasia spinulosa is a rare viral infection reported in immunosuppressed patients caused by the trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyoma virus". Poon F, et al. Spiky skin in a renal transplant patient. Australasian Journal of Dermatology 59 (Suppl. 1): 95-96, May 2018. Available from: URL: http:// doi.org/10.1111/ajd.17_12815 [abstract] - Australia 803323522 0114-9954/18/1704-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Jun 2018 No. 1704 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reactions Weekly Springer Journals

Mycophenolate-mofetil/tacrolimus

Reactions Weekly , Volume 1704 (1) – Jun 2, 2018
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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance; Pharmacology/Toxicology
ISSN
0114-9954
eISSN
1179-2051
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40278-018-46919-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactions 1704, p276 - 2 Jun 2018 Trichodysplasia spinulosa: case report An elderly woman in her early 70s [age at the time of reaction onset not stated] developed trichodysplasia spinulosa during treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus [routes and duration of treatments to reaction onset not stated]. The woman presented with a one-year history of facial rash on the cheeks and eyebrows at the age of 72 years. The rash then spread to the chin, nose and the upper trunk. The lesions appeared mildly pruritic. She had a significant history of end stage renal failure, after which, she had undergone a cadaveric renal transplantation two years prior. She was prescribed immunosuppressant therapy with tacrolimus 8mg twice a day and mycophenolate-mofetil 200mg twice a day. A clinical examination demonstrated multiple flesh-coloured follicular papules and keratin spines against an erythematous background. Thereafter, the woman was ineffectively treated with clobetasone or ivermectin. A diagnostic skin biopsy of the right ear showed dilatation and keratotic plugging of the hair infundibula along with significant expansion and dystrophy of the inner root sheath. Immunohistochemistry test was positive for SV40 polyoma virus. These findings were suggestive of trichodysplasia spinulosa [outcome not stated]. Author comment: "We present a rare case of trichodysplasia spinulosa against a background of long-term immunosuppression as a result of renal transplantation." "Trichodysplasia spinulosa is a rare viral infection reported in immunosuppressed patients caused by the trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyoma virus". Poon F, et al. Spiky skin in a renal transplant patient. Australasian Journal of Dermatology 59 (Suppl. 1): 95-96, May 2018. Available from: URL: http:// doi.org/10.1111/ajd.17_12815 [abstract] - Australia 803323522 0114-9954/18/1704-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Jun 2018 No. 1704

Journal

Reactions WeeklySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

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