Multiple photostabilization actions of heartwood extract from Acacia confusa

Multiple photostabilization actions of heartwood extract from Acacia confusa Compared to toxic and carcinogenic synthetic photostabilizers, application of plant phenolics as natural photostabilizers is more environmentally friendly. Previous works demonstrated the heartwood extract (HWE) of Acacia confusa has the potential to be a natural wood photostabilizer. However, its exact photostabilities and wood photoprotection abilities are not fully understood. This study aimed to illustrate the photostabilities of the HWE on wood and to recognize the effective components in HWE. The results obtained from the wood photoprotection test and photostability analyses revealed that HWE and its fractions possessed wood photoprotection abilities to retard lignin photodegradation, especially HWE and its EtOAc fraction, due to the abundant catecholic flavonoids endowing the multiple photostabilities, including UVA absorptivity, singlet oxygen quenching ability and phenoxyl radical scavenging efficacy. In addition, the photostability-guided isolation method was successively established for investigating the multiple photostabilization actions of HWE. Accordingly, this method can be applied as the standard procedure for isolating photostabilizers from plant secondary metabolites. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wood Science and Technology Springer Journals

Multiple photostabilization actions of heartwood extract from Acacia confusa

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Life Sciences; Wood Science & Technology; Ceramics, Glass, Composites, Natural Materials; Operating Procedures, Materials Treatment
ISSN
0043-7719
eISSN
1432-5225
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00226-017-0930-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Compared to toxic and carcinogenic synthetic photostabilizers, application of plant phenolics as natural photostabilizers is more environmentally friendly. Previous works demonstrated the heartwood extract (HWE) of Acacia confusa has the potential to be a natural wood photostabilizer. However, its exact photostabilities and wood photoprotection abilities are not fully understood. This study aimed to illustrate the photostabilities of the HWE on wood and to recognize the effective components in HWE. The results obtained from the wood photoprotection test and photostability analyses revealed that HWE and its fractions possessed wood photoprotection abilities to retard lignin photodegradation, especially HWE and its EtOAc fraction, due to the abundant catecholic flavonoids endowing the multiple photostabilities, including UVA absorptivity, singlet oxygen quenching ability and phenoxyl radical scavenging efficacy. In addition, the photostability-guided isolation method was successively established for investigating the multiple photostabilization actions of HWE. Accordingly, this method can be applied as the standard procedure for isolating photostabilizers from plant secondary metabolites.

Journal

Wood Science and TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2017

References

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