Multiple drugs

Multiple drugs Reactions 1680, p246 - 2 Dec 2017 Vomiting and dizziness: 2 case reports In a study of Adverse drug events database, two patients (73-year-old man and 30-year-old woman) were described, who developed vomiting or dizziness following therapy with tramadol [tramadol hcl], ranitidine [Zantac], tranexamic acid, norepinephrine [Levophed], fentanyl [Durogesic D-trans] and mannitol or pethidine [pethidine hcl], ranitidine [Curan], and metoclopramide [Meckool and Macperan] [indications, routes, times to reactions onsets and outcomes not stated; not all dosages stated]. The 73-year-old man experienced vomiting on 09 March 2015 after taking medications which included, tramadol 50mg, ranitidine, tranexamic acid, norepinephrine, fentanyl and mannitol. According to the database, the six drugs were found to be related to vomiting. The dose of tramadol was reduced to 50mg on 12 March 2015. As per the WHO- Uppsala monitoring center criteria, the causality between tramadol and vomiting was assessed as probable. The 30-year-old woman developed dizziness on 18 April 2015 after taking medications including pethidine, ranitidine and metoclopramide. Author comment: "The six drugs amongst the list of drugs that the patient was taking on the symptom start date, were found to be related to vomiting according to the database. Among the six drugs, [tramadol] was the most highly ranked according to the decision tree model, and thus would have been recommended as the main culprit drug." "In this case, [pethidine] was recommended by the system as the drug that may be the source of dizziness side effect." Shin SK, et al. A personalized and learning approach for identifying drugs with adverse events. Yonsei Medical Journal 58: 1229-1236, No. 6, Nov 2017. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.3349/ymj.2017.58.6.1229 - South Korea 803283912 0114-9954/17/1680-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Dec 2017 No. 1680 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reactions Weekly Springer Journals

Multiple drugs

Reactions Weekly , Volume 1680 (1) – Dec 2, 2017
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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance; Pharmacology/Toxicology
ISSN
0114-9954
eISSN
1179-2051
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40278-017-39177-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactions 1680, p246 - 2 Dec 2017 Vomiting and dizziness: 2 case reports In a study of Adverse drug events database, two patients (73-year-old man and 30-year-old woman) were described, who developed vomiting or dizziness following therapy with tramadol [tramadol hcl], ranitidine [Zantac], tranexamic acid, norepinephrine [Levophed], fentanyl [Durogesic D-trans] and mannitol or pethidine [pethidine hcl], ranitidine [Curan], and metoclopramide [Meckool and Macperan] [indications, routes, times to reactions onsets and outcomes not stated; not all dosages stated]. The 73-year-old man experienced vomiting on 09 March 2015 after taking medications which included, tramadol 50mg, ranitidine, tranexamic acid, norepinephrine, fentanyl and mannitol. According to the database, the six drugs were found to be related to vomiting. The dose of tramadol was reduced to 50mg on 12 March 2015. As per the WHO- Uppsala monitoring center criteria, the causality between tramadol and vomiting was assessed as probable. The 30-year-old woman developed dizziness on 18 April 2015 after taking medications including pethidine, ranitidine and metoclopramide. Author comment: "The six drugs amongst the list of drugs that the patient was taking on the symptom start date, were found to be related to vomiting according to the database. Among the six drugs, [tramadol] was the most highly ranked according to the decision tree model, and thus would have been recommended as the main culprit drug." "In this case, [pethidine] was recommended by the system as the drug that may be the source of dizziness side effect." Shin SK, et al. A personalized and learning approach for identifying drugs with adverse events. Yonsei Medical Journal 58: 1229-1236, No. 6, Nov 2017. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.3349/ymj.2017.58.6.1229 - South Korea 803283912 0114-9954/17/1680-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Dec 2017 No. 1680

Journal

Reactions WeeklySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 2, 2017

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