Mosaic capillaroscopic findings in systemic sclerosis

Mosaic capillaroscopic findings in systemic sclerosis A 67-year-old woman with triphasic Raynaud’s phenomenon since 2 years was diagnosed as having limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc) 1 year ago based on puffy fingers, positive antinuclear and anti-Scl-70 autoantibodies, and initial pulmonary fibrosis. Capillaroscopic examination revealed “mosaic” capillaroscopic findings that included normal pattern; “scleroderma”-type capillaroscopic pattern “early” phase, with single giant capillaries and haemorrhages, preserved capillary distribution; and “scleroderma”-type capillaroscopic pattern “active” phase, with high number of giant capillary loops and haemorrhages, moderately disturbed distribution. Nailfold capillaroscopy is an established non-invasive imaging technique for morphologic evaluation of the capillaries in the nail-fold area that reveals diagnostic changes in the majority of SSc patients. It has been included in the recently published EULAR/ACR (European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology) classification criteria for SSc (2013). The generalized microangiopathy is a cardinal feature of SSc, but the underlying endothelial damage of the capillaries varies in the different compartments of the body, sometimes even within the same organ. As typical capillaroscopic findings are diagnostic in clinical context, this case of a “mosaic” pattern should remind the clinicians that the capillaroscopic examination should be performed for the eight fingers bilaterally (excluding the thumbs because of poor visibility), in order to detect the presence of all types and grades of pathological microvascular changes to facilitate the highest diagnostic accuracy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift Springer Journals

Mosaic capillaroscopic findings in systemic sclerosis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, ein Teil von Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Pharmacology/Toxicology; General Practice / Family Medicine; Geriatrics/Gerontology; Internal Medicine; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0043-5341
eISSN
1563-258X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10354-018-0617-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A 67-year-old woman with triphasic Raynaud’s phenomenon since 2 years was diagnosed as having limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc) 1 year ago based on puffy fingers, positive antinuclear and anti-Scl-70 autoantibodies, and initial pulmonary fibrosis. Capillaroscopic examination revealed “mosaic” capillaroscopic findings that included normal pattern; “scleroderma”-type capillaroscopic pattern “early” phase, with single giant capillaries and haemorrhages, preserved capillary distribution; and “scleroderma”-type capillaroscopic pattern “active” phase, with high number of giant capillary loops and haemorrhages, moderately disturbed distribution. Nailfold capillaroscopy is an established non-invasive imaging technique for morphologic evaluation of the capillaries in the nail-fold area that reveals diagnostic changes in the majority of SSc patients. It has been included in the recently published EULAR/ACR (European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology) classification criteria for SSc (2013). The generalized microangiopathy is a cardinal feature of SSc, but the underlying endothelial damage of the capillaries varies in the different compartments of the body, sometimes even within the same organ. As typical capillaroscopic findings are diagnostic in clinical context, this case of a “mosaic” pattern should remind the clinicians that the capillaroscopic examination should be performed for the eight fingers bilaterally (excluding the thumbs because of poor visibility), in order to detect the presence of all types and grades of pathological microvascular changes to facilitate the highest diagnostic accuracy.

Journal

Wiener Medizinische WochenschriftSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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