More than Men: Latino Feminist Masculinities and Intersectionality

More than Men: Latino Feminist Masculinities and Intersectionality This qualitative study analyzes the definitions of manhood provided by a US sample of 36 adult, working class Latinos who identify as feminist, and have attended institutions of higher education. Using an intersectional framework, we analyze in-depth interviews and address the research questions “To what extent did participants identify with their gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class background? How did participants subjectively define what it means to be a man?”. Results indicate that participants identified with their significant social groups to varying degrees. Manhood was defined in relational, ethical, and counter-hegemonic ways. Our discussion examines the way participants wove in and out of discourses related to hegemonic notions of manhood deemed as positive, while simultaneously rejecting aspects of hegemonic masculinity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

More than Men: Latino Feminist Masculinities and Intersectionality

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-008-9405-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This qualitative study analyzes the definitions of manhood provided by a US sample of 36 adult, working class Latinos who identify as feminist, and have attended institutions of higher education. Using an intersectional framework, we analyze in-depth interviews and address the research questions “To what extent did participants identify with their gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class background? How did participants subjectively define what it means to be a man?”. Results indicate that participants identified with their significant social groups to varying degrees. Manhood was defined in relational, ethical, and counter-hegemonic ways. Our discussion examines the way participants wove in and out of discourses related to hegemonic notions of manhood deemed as positive, while simultaneously rejecting aspects of hegemonic masculinity.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 27, 2008

References

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