Molecular Mechanisms of Electrogenic Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransport: Structural and Equilibrium Thermodynamic Considerations

Molecular Mechanisms of Electrogenic Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransport: Structural and Equilibrium... The electrogenic Na+-HCO3 − cotransporters play an essential role in regulating intracellular pH and extracellular acid-base homeostasis. Of the known members of the bicarbonate transporter superfamily (BTS), NBC1 and NBC4 proteins have been shown to be electrogenic. The electrogenic nature of these transporters results from the unequal coupling of anionic and cationic fluxes during each transport cycle. This unique property distinguishes NBC1 and NBC4 proteins from other sodium bicarbonate cotransporters and members of the bicarbonate transporter superfamily that are known to be electroneutral. Structure-function studies have played an essential role in revealing the basis for the modulation of the coupling ratio of NBC1 proteins. In addition, the recent transmembrane topographic analysis of pNBC1 has shed light on the potential structural determinants that are responsible for ion permeation through the cotransporter. The experimentally difficult problem of determining the nature of anionic species being transported by these proteins (HCO3 − versus CO3 2−) is analyzed using a theoretical equilibrium thermodynamics approach. Finally, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of ion coupling and flux through electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporters is reviewed in detail. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Molecular Mechanisms of Electrogenic Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransport: Structural and Equilibrium Thermodynamic Considerations

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Philosophy
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-003-0643-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The electrogenic Na+-HCO3 − cotransporters play an essential role in regulating intracellular pH and extracellular acid-base homeostasis. Of the known members of the bicarbonate transporter superfamily (BTS), NBC1 and NBC4 proteins have been shown to be electrogenic. The electrogenic nature of these transporters results from the unequal coupling of anionic and cationic fluxes during each transport cycle. This unique property distinguishes NBC1 and NBC4 proteins from other sodium bicarbonate cotransporters and members of the bicarbonate transporter superfamily that are known to be electroneutral. Structure-function studies have played an essential role in revealing the basis for the modulation of the coupling ratio of NBC1 proteins. In addition, the recent transmembrane topographic analysis of pNBC1 has shed light on the potential structural determinants that are responsible for ion permeation through the cotransporter. The experimentally difficult problem of determining the nature of anionic species being transported by these proteins (HCO3 − versus CO3 2−) is analyzed using a theoretical equilibrium thermodynamics approach. Finally, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of ion coupling and flux through electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporters is reviewed in detail.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2003

References

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