Molecular evidence of Orthopoxvirus DNA in capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) stool samples

Molecular evidence of Orthopoxvirus DNA in capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) stool samples Vaccinia virus (VACV) is responsible for outbreaks in Brazil and has immense potential as an emerging virus. VACV can be found naturally circulating in India, Pakistan and South America, where it causes infections characterised by exanthematic lesions in buffaloes, cattle and humans. The transmission cycle of Brazilian VACV has still not been fully characterised; one of the most important gaps in knowledge being the role of wild animals. Capybaras, which are restricted to the Americas, are the world’s largest rodents and have peculiar characteristics that make them possible candidates for being part of a natural VACV reservoir. Here, we developed a method for detecting orthopoxvirus DNA in capybara stool samples, and have described for the first time the detection of orthopoxvirus DNA in capybaras samples from three different regions in Brazil. These findings strongly suggest that capybaras might be involved in the natural transmission cycle of VACV and furthermore represent a public health problem, when associated with Brazilian bovine vaccinia outbreaks. This makes infected animals an important factor to be considered when predicting and managing Brazilian VACV outbreaks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Molecular evidence of Orthopoxvirus DNA in capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) stool samples

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Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-016-3121-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Vaccinia virus (VACV) is responsible for outbreaks in Brazil and has immense potential as an emerging virus. VACV can be found naturally circulating in India, Pakistan and South America, where it causes infections characterised by exanthematic lesions in buffaloes, cattle and humans. The transmission cycle of Brazilian VACV has still not been fully characterised; one of the most important gaps in knowledge being the role of wild animals. Capybaras, which are restricted to the Americas, are the world’s largest rodents and have peculiar characteristics that make them possible candidates for being part of a natural VACV reservoir. Here, we developed a method for detecting orthopoxvirus DNA in capybara stool samples, and have described for the first time the detection of orthopoxvirus DNA in capybaras samples from three different regions in Brazil. These findings strongly suggest that capybaras might be involved in the natural transmission cycle of VACV and furthermore represent a public health problem, when associated with Brazilian bovine vaccinia outbreaks. This makes infected animals an important factor to be considered when predicting and managing Brazilian VACV outbreaks.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 22, 2016

References

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