Molecular Evidence for Asymmetric Evolution of Sister Duplicated Blocks after Cereal Polyploidy

Molecular Evidence for Asymmetric Evolution of Sister Duplicated Blocks after Cereal Polyploidy Polyploidy (genome duplication) is thought to have contributed to the evolution of the eukaryotic genome, but complex genome structures and massive gene loss during evolution has complicated detection of these ancestral duplication events. The major factors determining the fate of duplicated genes are currently unclear, as are the processes by which duplicated genes evolve after polyploidy. Fine-scale analysis between homologous regions may allow us to better understand post-polyploidy evolution. Here, using gene-by-gene and gene-by-genome strategies, we identified the S5 region and four homologous regions within the japonica genome. Additional phylogenomic analyses of the comparable duplicated blocks indicate that four successive duplication events gave rise to these five regions, allowing us to propose a model for this local chromosomal evolution. According to this model, gene loss may play a major role in post-duplication genetic evolution at the segmental level. Moreover, we found molecular evidence that one of the sister duplicated blocks experienced more gene loss and a more rapid evolution subsequent to two recent duplication events. Given that these two recent duplication events were likely involved in polyploidy, this asymmetric evolution (gene loss and gene divergence) may be one possible mechanism accounting for the diploidization at the segmental level. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Molecular Evidence for Asymmetric Evolution of Sister Duplicated Blocks after Cereal Polyploidy

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-005-4414-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Polyploidy (genome duplication) is thought to have contributed to the evolution of the eukaryotic genome, but complex genome structures and massive gene loss during evolution has complicated detection of these ancestral duplication events. The major factors determining the fate of duplicated genes are currently unclear, as are the processes by which duplicated genes evolve after polyploidy. Fine-scale analysis between homologous regions may allow us to better understand post-polyploidy evolution. Here, using gene-by-gene and gene-by-genome strategies, we identified the S5 region and four homologous regions within the japonica genome. Additional phylogenomic analyses of the comparable duplicated blocks indicate that four successive duplication events gave rise to these five regions, allowing us to propose a model for this local chromosomal evolution. According to this model, gene loss may play a major role in post-duplication genetic evolution at the segmental level. Moreover, we found molecular evidence that one of the sister duplicated blocks experienced more gene loss and a more rapid evolution subsequent to two recent duplication events. Given that these two recent duplication events were likely involved in polyploidy, this asymmetric evolution (gene loss and gene divergence) may be one possible mechanism accounting for the diploidization at the segmental level.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 22, 2005

References

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