Molecular basis of the Cd36 chromosomal deletion underlying SHR defects in insulin action and fatty acid metabolism

Molecular basis of the Cd36 chromosomal deletion underlying SHR defects in insulin action and... The human insulin resistance syndromes—type 2 diabetes, obesity, combined hyperlipidemia, and essential hypertension—are genetically complex disorders whose molecular basis is largely unknown. The spontaneously hypertensive rate (SHR) is a model of these human syndromes. In the SHR/NCrlBR strain, a chromosomal deletion event that occurred at the Cd36 locus during the evolution of this SHR strain has been proposed as a cause of defective insulin action and fatty acid metabolism. In this study, three copies of the Cd36 gene, one transcribed copy and two pseudogenes, were identified in normal rat strains, but only a single gene in SHR/NCrlBR. Analysis of SHR genomic sequence localized the chromosomal deletion event between intron 4 of the normally transcribed copy of the gene and intron 4 of the second pseudogene. The deletion led to the creation of a single chimeric Cd36 gene in SHR/NCrlBR. The boundaries of the recombination/deletion junction identified within intron 4 were surrounded by long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) and DNA topoisomerase I recognition sequences. An 8-bp deletion at the intron 14/exon 15 boundary of the second pseudogene abolishes the putative splice acceptor site and is the cause of an aberrant 3′ UTR previously observed in SHR/NCrlBR. We conclude that in SHR/NCrlBR, the complex trait of insulin resistance and defective fatty acid metabolism is caused by Cd36 deficiency, resulting from a chromosomal deletion caused by unequal recombination. This demonstrates that chromosomal deletions caused by unequal recombination can be a cause of quantitative or complex mammalian phenotypes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Molecular basis of the Cd36 chromosomal deletion underlying SHR defects in insulin action and fatty acid metabolism

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Anatomy; Zoology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-001-2132-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The human insulin resistance syndromes—type 2 diabetes, obesity, combined hyperlipidemia, and essential hypertension—are genetically complex disorders whose molecular basis is largely unknown. The spontaneously hypertensive rate (SHR) is a model of these human syndromes. In the SHR/NCrlBR strain, a chromosomal deletion event that occurred at the Cd36 locus during the evolution of this SHR strain has been proposed as a cause of defective insulin action and fatty acid metabolism. In this study, three copies of the Cd36 gene, one transcribed copy and two pseudogenes, were identified in normal rat strains, but only a single gene in SHR/NCrlBR. Analysis of SHR genomic sequence localized the chromosomal deletion event between intron 4 of the normally transcribed copy of the gene and intron 4 of the second pseudogene. The deletion led to the creation of a single chimeric Cd36 gene in SHR/NCrlBR. The boundaries of the recombination/deletion junction identified within intron 4 were surrounded by long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) and DNA topoisomerase I recognition sequences. An 8-bp deletion at the intron 14/exon 15 boundary of the second pseudogene abolishes the putative splice acceptor site and is the cause of an aberrant 3′ UTR previously observed in SHR/NCrlBR. We conclude that in SHR/NCrlBR, the complex trait of insulin resistance and defective fatty acid metabolism is caused by Cd36 deficiency, resulting from a chromosomal deletion caused by unequal recombination. This demonstrates that chromosomal deletions caused by unequal recombination can be a cause of quantitative or complex mammalian phenotypes.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 15, 2014

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