Molecular assessment of glyphosate-degradation pathway via sarcosine intermediate in Lysinibacillus sphaericus

Molecular assessment of glyphosate-degradation pathway via sarcosine intermediate in... The widespread use of glyphosate has permeated not only small- and large-scale agriculture, but also the fight against drug trafficking and illicit crops. Health, alimentary security, and the rights of peasant and indigenous communities have been compromised in countries with intensive use of glyphosate-based herbicides. In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified this substance as probably carcinogenic to humans, leading to the suspension of aerial glyphosate spraying the same year in countries like Colombia, where glyphosate has been extensively used in illicit crop eradication. Notwithstanding, according to a study of the U.S. Geological Survey, traces of glyphosate and its main degradation product, AMPA, remain in soil year after year. This underscores the urgency and importance of assessing new technologies to degrade glyphosate present in soils and waterbodies without leaving persistent byproducts. The aim of this study was to evaluate Lysinibacillus sphaericus’ glyphosate uptake as a carbon and phosphorous source by a sarcosine-mediated metabolic pathway that releases glycine as final degradation product. To accomplish this, molecular and analytic evidence were collected in vitro from sarcosine oxidase activity, a key enzyme of a degradation pathway which releases byproducts that are easy to incorporate into natural biosynthesis routes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Molecular assessment of glyphosate-degradation pathway via sarcosine intermediate in Lysinibacillus sphaericus

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-018-2364-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The widespread use of glyphosate has permeated not only small- and large-scale agriculture, but also the fight against drug trafficking and illicit crops. Health, alimentary security, and the rights of peasant and indigenous communities have been compromised in countries with intensive use of glyphosate-based herbicides. In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified this substance as probably carcinogenic to humans, leading to the suspension of aerial glyphosate spraying the same year in countries like Colombia, where glyphosate has been extensively used in illicit crop eradication. Notwithstanding, according to a study of the U.S. Geological Survey, traces of glyphosate and its main degradation product, AMPA, remain in soil year after year. This underscores the urgency and importance of assessing new technologies to degrade glyphosate present in soils and waterbodies without leaving persistent byproducts. The aim of this study was to evaluate Lysinibacillus sphaericus’ glyphosate uptake as a carbon and phosphorous source by a sarcosine-mediated metabolic pathway that releases glycine as final degradation product. To accomplish this, molecular and analytic evidence were collected in vitro from sarcosine oxidase activity, a key enzyme of a degradation pathway which releases byproducts that are easy to incorporate into natural biosynthesis routes.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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