Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Flooding Avoidance and Tolerance in Rice

Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Flooding Avoidance and Tolerance in Rice Submergence is one of the major constraints in rice production. The main factor limiting rice survival during submergence is oxygen deprivation. To cope with flooding conditions, rice has developed two survival strategies: either rapid elongation of the submerged tissues to keep up with the rising water level or no elongation to save carbohydrate resources for maintenance of energy production under submerged and concomitant hypoxic conditions. The survival strategies used by rice have been studied quite extensively and the role of several phytohormones in the elongation response has been established. The mechanisms of submergence tolerance include metabolic changes, for instance, the shift to an ethanolic fermentation pathway, reduced elongation growth to save carbohydrates and energy for maintenance processes, and protective antioxidant systems. Current molecular technology can provide tools for the understanding of mechanisms developed by rice to survive submergence. In addition, cloning of genes related to submergence tolerance might open new ways to genetic improvement of this crop. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Flooding Avoidance and Tolerance in Rice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/molecular-and-physiological-mechanisms-of-flooding-avoidance-and-4p9E7RXtkG
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUPP.0000003272.65496.04
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Submergence is one of the major constraints in rice production. The main factor limiting rice survival during submergence is oxygen deprivation. To cope with flooding conditions, rice has developed two survival strategies: either rapid elongation of the submerged tissues to keep up with the rising water level or no elongation to save carbohydrate resources for maintenance of energy production under submerged and concomitant hypoxic conditions. The survival strategies used by rice have been studied quite extensively and the role of several phytohormones in the elongation response has been established. The mechanisms of submergence tolerance include metabolic changes, for instance, the shift to an ethanolic fermentation pathway, reduced elongation growth to save carbohydrates and energy for maintenance processes, and protective antioxidant systems. Current molecular technology can provide tools for the understanding of mechanisms developed by rice to survive submergence. In addition, cloning of genes related to submergence tolerance might open new ways to genetic improvement of this crop.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off