Modeling solubility of CO2/hydrocarbon gas in ionic liquid ([emim][FAP]) using Aspen Plus simulations

Modeling solubility of CO2/hydrocarbon gas in ionic liquid ([emim][FAP]) using Aspen Plus... The Peng-Robinson equation of state with quadratic van der Waals (vdW) mixing rule model was chosen to perform the thermodynamic calculations in Flash3 column of Aspen Plus to predict the solubility of CO2 or any one of the hydrocarbons (HCs) among methane, ethane, propane, and butane in an ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([emim][FAP]). Bubble point pressure, solubility, bubble point temperature, fugacity, and partial molar volume at infinite dilution were obtained from the simulations, and enthalpy of absorption, Gibbs free energy of solvation, and entropy change of absorption were estimated by thermodynamic relations. Results show that carbon chain length has a significant effect on the bubble point pressure. Methane has the highest bubble point pressure among all the considered HCs and CO2. The bubble point pressure and fugacity variation with temperature is different for CO2 as compared to HCs for mole fractions above 0.2. Two different profiles are noticed for enthalpy of absorption when plotted as a function of mole fraction of gas soluble in IL. Partial molar volume of CO2 decreases with increase in temperature in [emim][FAP], while it is increased for HCs. Bubble point temperature decreases with increase in the mole fraction of the solute. Entropy of solvation increases with temperature till a particular value followed by a decrease with further increase in temperature. Gibbs free energy change of solvation showed that the process of solubility was spontaneous. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Modeling solubility of CO2/hydrocarbon gas in ionic liquid ([emim][FAP]) using Aspen Plus simulations

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-9408-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

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