Mitochondrial DNA variation pattern in larches of Eastern Siberia and the Far East

Mitochondrial DNA variation pattern in larches of Eastern Siberia and the Far East Genetic variation has been studied in 32 Eastern Siberian and Far Eastern populations of Larix Mill. with the use of three mitochondrial markers based on polymerase chain reaction. Eight multilocus haplotypes with a heterogeneous spatial distribution (G ST = 0.788, N ST = 0.829) have been found, which indicates limited gene flows between populations. Several geographic regions with specific larch haplotype sets have been determined: (1) Japan, (2) southern Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands, (3) Primor’e and Korea, (4) Kamchatka, and (5) Eastern Siberia and the northern Far East. The haplotype fixed in the Kamchatka is absent in the Magadan oblast or Chukotka but is present in southern Primor’e and Sakhalin Island. This may be explained by either the postglacial recolonization of Kamchatka by larch that spread from Primor’e through Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands or its survival through the last glacial maximum in the Kamchatka Peninsula. The biogeography of larch and other woody plants indicate that boreal species have a common history of the colonization of Kamchatka. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Mitochondrial DNA variation pattern in larches of Eastern Siberia and the Far East

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Microbial Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795407060075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Genetic variation has been studied in 32 Eastern Siberian and Far Eastern populations of Larix Mill. with the use of three mitochondrial markers based on polymerase chain reaction. Eight multilocus haplotypes with a heterogeneous spatial distribution (G ST = 0.788, N ST = 0.829) have been found, which indicates limited gene flows between populations. Several geographic regions with specific larch haplotype sets have been determined: (1) Japan, (2) southern Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands, (3) Primor’e and Korea, (4) Kamchatka, and (5) Eastern Siberia and the northern Far East. The haplotype fixed in the Kamchatka is absent in the Magadan oblast or Chukotka but is present in southern Primor’e and Sakhalin Island. This may be explained by either the postglacial recolonization of Kamchatka by larch that spread from Primor’e through Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands or its survival through the last glacial maximum in the Kamchatka Peninsula. The biogeography of larch and other woody plants indicate that boreal species have a common history of the colonization of Kamchatka.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 28, 2007

References

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