Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): evidence and speculations

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): evidence and speculations In 2012, a novel human coronavirus emerged and was tentatively named “Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus” (MERS-CoV). The high mortality rate of MERS-CoV focused attention on the ecology of the virus. It has been found that MERS-CoV belongs to the group C lineage of the genus Betacoronavirus . Coronavirus surveillance studies in different populations of bats have suggested that they are probable reservoirs for this novel virus, and phylogenetic analysis of both the spike (S1) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase proteins of MERS-CoV have revealed that it is related to bat viruses. Recently, the MERS-CoV and its neutralizing antibodies were detected in dromedary camels. Despite the limited number of reported cases of person-to-person transmission, the rapid evolution of the virus poses a continuous threat to humans worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the virology, clinical spectrum, evolution, diagnosis and treatment of MERS-CoV infections. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): evidence and speculations

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Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-014-1995-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 2012, a novel human coronavirus emerged and was tentatively named “Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus” (MERS-CoV). The high mortality rate of MERS-CoV focused attention on the ecology of the virus. It has been found that MERS-CoV belongs to the group C lineage of the genus Betacoronavirus . Coronavirus surveillance studies in different populations of bats have suggested that they are probable reservoirs for this novel virus, and phylogenetic analysis of both the spike (S1) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase proteins of MERS-CoV have revealed that it is related to bat viruses. Recently, the MERS-CoV and its neutralizing antibodies were detected in dromedary camels. Despite the limited number of reported cases of person-to-person transmission, the rapid evolution of the virus poses a continuous threat to humans worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the virology, clinical spectrum, evolution, diagnosis and treatment of MERS-CoV infections.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 1, 2014

References

  • Receptor for new coronavirus found
    Butler, D
  • SARS: epidemiology
    Chan-Yeung, M; Xu, RH
  • Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 is a functional receptor for the emerging human coronavirus-EMC
    Raj, VS; Mou, H; Smits, SL; Dekkers, DH; Müller, MA; Dijkman, R; Muth, D; Demmers, JA; Zaki, A; Fouchier, RA; Thiel, V; Drosten, C; Rottier, PJ; Osterhaus, AD; Bosch, BJ; Haagmans, BL
  • Human (non-severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus infections in hospitalised children in France
    Vabret, A; Dina, J; Gouarin, S; Tripey, V; Brouard, J; Freymuth, F

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