Microwave drying kinetics of mussels (Mytilus edulis)

Microwave drying kinetics of mussels (Mytilus edulis) Keywords Activation energy  Effective moisture diffusivity  Energy consumption Microwave drying  Mussel Introduction It is known from archaeological excavations that humans have been eating mussels for thousands of years. They can be cooked or eaten raw. Additionally, mussels, which are known as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), are an edible bivalve mollusc marine product that corresponds to the Mytilidae family [1]. These mussels can be grown via intensive aquaculture. The world aquaculture production reached 97.2 million tons in 2013 with an estimated value of US$157 billion. A total of 575 aquatic species and species groups have been grown in fresh water, sea water and brackish water. In 2013, mussel production was approximately 1.756 million tons (96,621 tons by capture production) with an estimated value of US$3.32 billion. The main producers of Mytilus edulis are USA, Canada, Channel Islands, Spain, France, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Netherlands and Ireland [2]. Food products can easily decay and spoil because of microbiological activity, but this problem can be solved by decreasing the moisture content. However, there are several major disadvantages in the drying methods, especially the hot air drying of agricultural products. Specifically, low energy efficiency, quality loss and long drying time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Microwave drying kinetics of mussels (Mytilus edulis)

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Chemistry; Catalysis; Physical Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11164-016-2707-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keywords Activation energy  Effective moisture diffusivity  Energy consumption Microwave drying  Mussel Introduction It is known from archaeological excavations that humans have been eating mussels for thousands of years. They can be cooked or eaten raw. Additionally, mussels, which are known as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), are an edible bivalve mollusc marine product that corresponds to the Mytilidae family [1]. These mussels can be grown via intensive aquaculture. The world aquaculture production reached 97.2 million tons in 2013 with an estimated value of US$157 billion. A total of 575 aquatic species and species groups have been grown in fresh water, sea water and brackish water. In 2013, mussel production was approximately 1.756 million tons (96,621 tons by capture production) with an estimated value of US$3.32 billion. The main producers of Mytilus edulis are USA, Canada, Channel Islands, Spain, France, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Netherlands and Ireland [2]. Food products can easily decay and spoil because of microbiological activity, but this problem can be solved by decreasing the moisture content. However, there are several major disadvantages in the drying methods, especially the hot air drying of agricultural products. Specifically, low energy efficiency, quality loss and long drying time.

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 30, 2016

References

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