Metropolitan Influence and Land Use Competition in Potential Biomass Crop Production: A Spatial Demographic Analysis

Metropolitan Influence and Land Use Competition in Potential Biomass Crop Production: A Spatial... Biomass is one alternative energy source that is currently being investigated to combat the growing U.S. dependence on foreign oil. In this study, we explore where traditional farming practices and metropolitan influence will compete for land use against farmland located in optimal biomass crop production zones. To date, no consideration of the impact of urbanization and human development has been taken into account. Here we make a take a seminal approach to examining this relationship given previous analyses. We use overlapping LISA statistics to identify significant clusters of counties facing competition for land use. To measure competition for land use in counties located within biomass zones circa 2000, we use population growth and housing data from Census Bureau estimates, farmland data from the Census of Agriculture, and remotely sensed land use/cover data from the United States Geological Survey. The implications of these factors and how they will potentially affect biomass crop production are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Metropolitan Influence and Land Use Competition in Potential Biomass Crop Production: A Spatial Demographic Analysis

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences, general; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-012-9255-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biomass is one alternative energy source that is currently being investigated to combat the growing U.S. dependence on foreign oil. In this study, we explore where traditional farming practices and metropolitan influence will compete for land use against farmland located in optimal biomass crop production zones. To date, no consideration of the impact of urbanization and human development has been taken into account. Here we make a take a seminal approach to examining this relationship given previous analyses. We use overlapping LISA statistics to identify significant clusters of counties facing competition for land use. To measure competition for land use in counties located within biomass zones circa 2000, we use population growth and housing data from Census Bureau estimates, farmland data from the Census of Agriculture, and remotely sensed land use/cover data from the United States Geological Survey. The implications of these factors and how they will potentially affect biomass crop production are discussed.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 18, 2012

References

  • Biofuels: Boon or boondoggle?
    Bourne, J. K.
  • Continuities in size of place preferences in the United States, 1972–1992
    Brown, DL; Fuguitt, GV; Heaton, TB; Waseem, S
  • Carbon sequestration and biomass energy offset: Theoretical, potential and achievable capacities globally, in Europe and the UK
    Cannell, MGR

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