Metabolic syndrome contributes to renal injury mediated by hyperoxaluria in a murine model of nephrolithiasis

Metabolic syndrome contributes to renal injury mediated by hyperoxaluria in a murine model of... Metabolic syndrome (MS) individuals have a higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. MS has been also related with higher nephrolithiasis prevalence. To establish the influence of MS on renal function, we designed a murine model of combined metabolic syndrome and hyperoxaluria. Four groups of male Sprague–Dawley rats were established: (1) control group (n = 10) fed with standard chow; (2) stone former group (SF) (n = 10) fed with standard chow plus 0.75% ethylene glycol administered in the drinking water; (3) metabolic syndrome group (MS) (n = 10), fed with 60% fructose diet; (4) metabolic syndrome + stone former group (MS + SF) (n = 10), 60% fructose diet and 0.75% EG in the drinking water. MS group showed a significant injury to renal function when hyperoxaluria was induced. It was demonstrated by a significant decrease of creatinine clearance (p < 0.001), with higher tubular damage (34.3%, CI 95% 23.9–44.7, p < 0.001), produced by deposition of crystals, and increased tubular synthesis of osteopontin as a response to tubular damage. Induction of hyperoxaluria in rats with MS causes severe morphological alterations with a significant impairment of renal function. This impairment is not produced in rats without MS. Therefore, this model can be useful for the study of the influence of MS in stone formation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urological Research Springer Journals

Metabolic syndrome contributes to renal injury mediated by hyperoxaluria in a murine model of nephrolithiasis

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Urology; Nephrology; Medical Biochemistry
ISSN
2194-7228
eISSN
2194-7236
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00240-017-0979-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MS) individuals have a higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. MS has been also related with higher nephrolithiasis prevalence. To establish the influence of MS on renal function, we designed a murine model of combined metabolic syndrome and hyperoxaluria. Four groups of male Sprague–Dawley rats were established: (1) control group (n = 10) fed with standard chow; (2) stone former group (SF) (n = 10) fed with standard chow plus 0.75% ethylene glycol administered in the drinking water; (3) metabolic syndrome group (MS) (n = 10), fed with 60% fructose diet; (4) metabolic syndrome + stone former group (MS + SF) (n = 10), 60% fructose diet and 0.75% EG in the drinking water. MS group showed a significant injury to renal function when hyperoxaluria was induced. It was demonstrated by a significant decrease of creatinine clearance (p < 0.001), with higher tubular damage (34.3%, CI 95% 23.9–44.7, p < 0.001), produced by deposition of crystals, and increased tubular synthesis of osteopontin as a response to tubular damage. Induction of hyperoxaluria in rats with MS causes severe morphological alterations with a significant impairment of renal function. This impairment is not produced in rats without MS. Therefore, this model can be useful for the study of the influence of MS in stone formation.

Journal

Urological ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 12, 2017

References

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