Metabolic response to amylose-rich wheat-based rusks in overweight individuals

Metabolic response to amylose-rich wheat-based rusks in overweight individuals Background/objectives The amylose-amylopectin ratio influences starch properties. A higher amylose content is associated with slower starch digestion thus reducing the postprandial plasma glucose response and improving the overall postprandial metabolism. So far, limited evidence is available on the metabolic effect of wheat-based foods rich in amylose. This randomised controlled study investigated the acute metabolic effects of amylose-rich wheat-based rusks in overweight subjects focusing on potential mechanisms. Subjects/methods Ten overweight subjects consumed in random order two test meals differing only in the carbohydrate source: rusks prepared with amylose-rich wheat flour (ARR) or conventional wheat flour (control). Blood samples were taken at fasting and over 4 h after the meal. Satiety and intestinal fermentation were evaluated by VAS and H2-breath test, respectively. Results ARR reduced plasma glucose response during the first two hours after the meal and the desire to eat, and increased breath hydrogen concentration at 4 h (p < 0.05 for all). Moreover, according to computational models, the ARR slightly reduced intestinal glucose absorption in the first hour after the meal and increased the overall postprandial insulin sensitivity. Conclusions Rusks made with amylose-rich flour could be useful for improving postprandial glucose metabolism and reduce the desire to eat, thus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Clinical Nutrition Springer Journals
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Publisher
Nature Publishing Group UK
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Public Health; Epidemiology; Internal Medicine; Clinical Nutrition; Metabolic Diseases
ISSN
0954-3007
eISSN
1476-5640
D.O.I.
10.1038/s41430-018-0136-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background/objectives The amylose-amylopectin ratio influences starch properties. A higher amylose content is associated with slower starch digestion thus reducing the postprandial plasma glucose response and improving the overall postprandial metabolism. So far, limited evidence is available on the metabolic effect of wheat-based foods rich in amylose. This randomised controlled study investigated the acute metabolic effects of amylose-rich wheat-based rusks in overweight subjects focusing on potential mechanisms. Subjects/methods Ten overweight subjects consumed in random order two test meals differing only in the carbohydrate source: rusks prepared with amylose-rich wheat flour (ARR) or conventional wheat flour (control). Blood samples were taken at fasting and over 4 h after the meal. Satiety and intestinal fermentation were evaluated by VAS and H2-breath test, respectively. Results ARR reduced plasma glucose response during the first two hours after the meal and the desire to eat, and increased breath hydrogen concentration at 4 h (p < 0.05 for all). Moreover, according to computational models, the ARR slightly reduced intestinal glucose absorption in the first hour after the meal and increased the overall postprandial insulin sensitivity. Conclusions Rusks made with amylose-rich flour could be useful for improving postprandial glucose metabolism and reduce the desire to eat, thus

Journal

European Journal of Clinical NutritionSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2018

References

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