Medical costs higher after motorcycle versus car crashes

Medical costs higher after motorcycle versus car crashes PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 792, p18 - 2 Dec 2017 Medical costs higher after motorcycle versus car crashes Medical costs for injuries appear to be higher after motorcycle accidents than after car crashes in Canada, according to findings of a study published in the CMAJ. This matched cohort study in Ontario used data from linked health administrative databases at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences to compare healthcare costs in adults who presented to hospital after a motorcycle or car accident between 2007 and 2013. Direct medical costs within two years after the accidents were estimated from a Canadian payer perspective. In total, 26 831 patients were injured in motorcycle accidents and 281 826 were injured in car crashes. Costs were significantly higher after motorcycle accidents than after car crashes ($5825 vs $2995; p<0.001). Moreover, the annual injury rate was significantly higher for motorcycles versus cars (2194 vs 718 per 100 000 registered vehicles; incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.1; 95% CI 2.8, 3.3; p<0.001), and the annual rate of severe injuries with an Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3 was significantly greater (125 vs 12 per 100 000 registered vehicles; IRR 10.4; 95% CI 8.3, 13.1; p<0.001). "Considering both the attributable cost and higher rate of injury, we found that each registered motorcycle in Ontario costs the public health care system 6 times the amount of each registered automobile, " concluded the investigators. "An understanding of these consequences may play a key role in public health strategy aimed at improving motorcycle safety," they said. * 2013 Canadian dollars Pincus D, et al. Direct medical costs of motorcycle crashes in Ontario. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal 189: E1410-E1415, No. 46, 20 Nov 2017. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.170337 803286168 1173-5503/17/0792-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 2 Dec 2017 No. 792 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News Springer Journals

Medical costs higher after motorcycle versus car crashes

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes; Quality of Life Research; Health Economics; Public Health
ISSN
1173-5503
eISSN
1179-2043
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40274-017-4541-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 792, p18 - 2 Dec 2017 Medical costs higher after motorcycle versus car crashes Medical costs for injuries appear to be higher after motorcycle accidents than after car crashes in Canada, according to findings of a study published in the CMAJ. This matched cohort study in Ontario used data from linked health administrative databases at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences to compare healthcare costs in adults who presented to hospital after a motorcycle or car accident between 2007 and 2013. Direct medical costs within two years after the accidents were estimated from a Canadian payer perspective. In total, 26 831 patients were injured in motorcycle accidents and 281 826 were injured in car crashes. Costs were significantly higher after motorcycle accidents than after car crashes ($5825 vs $2995; p<0.001). Moreover, the annual injury rate was significantly higher for motorcycles versus cars (2194 vs 718 per 100 000 registered vehicles; incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.1; 95% CI 2.8, 3.3; p<0.001), and the annual rate of severe injuries with an Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3 was significantly greater (125 vs 12 per 100 000 registered vehicles; IRR 10.4; 95% CI 8.3, 13.1; p<0.001). "Considering both the attributable cost and higher rate of injury, we found that each registered motorcycle in Ontario costs the public health care system 6 times the amount of each registered automobile, " concluded the investigators. "An understanding of these consequences may play a key role in public health strategy aimed at improving motorcycle safety," they said. * 2013 Canadian dollars Pincus D, et al. Direct medical costs of motorcycle crashes in Ontario. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal 189: E1410-E1415, No. 46, 20 Nov 2017. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.170337 803286168 1173-5503/17/0792-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 2 Dec 2017 No. 792

Journal

PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes NewsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 2, 2017

References

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