Mechanisms and factors involved in development of hypertrophic scars

Mechanisms and factors involved in development of hypertrophic scars Fibroblasts in granulation tissue (myofibroblasts) develop several ultrastructural and biochemical features of smooth muscle cells, such as the presence of microfilament bundles and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. The mechanisms leading to the development of such myofibroblastic features remain unclear. Both in vivo and in vitro investigations suggest the participation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix in the regulation of α-smooth muscle actin expression. During normal wound healing, myofibroblasts disappear when the wound is fully re-epithelialized. In contrast, the expression of α-smooth muscle actin is a permanent feature of myofibroblasts present in fibrocontractive diseases. In hypertrophic scars, the presence of these cells may represent an important element in the pathogenesis of retraction. Different therapeutic modalities available for the treatment of hypertrophic scars cause a decrease in the number of α-smooth muscle actin expressing myofibroblasts. Further studies regarding the expression of cytoskeleton markers in fibroblastic cells are needed to understand the mechanisms of scarring and fibrosis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Plastic Surgery Springer Journals

Mechanisms and factors involved in development of hypertrophic scars

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Plastic Surgery
ISSN
0930-343X
eISSN
1435-0130
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF01152418
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

References

  • Reduced collagenase gene expression in fibroblast from hypertrophic scar tissue
    Arakawa, M; Hatamochi, A; Mori, Y; Ueki, H; Moriguchi, T
  • Accelerated wound repair, cell proliferation and collagen accumulation are produced by a cartilage-derived growth factor
    Davidson, JM; Klagsburn, M; Hill, KE; Buckley, A; Sullivan, R; Brewer, PS; Woorward, SC

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