Measurement of laminar, transitional and turbulent pipe flow using Stereoscopic-PIV

Measurement of laminar, transitional and turbulent pipe flow using Stereoscopic-PIV Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) is applied to measure the instantaneous three component velocity field of pipe flow over the full circular cross-section of the pipe. The light sheet is oriented perpendicular to the main flow direction, and therefore the flow structures are advected through the measurement plane by the mean flow. Applying Taylor’s hypothesis, the 3D flow field is reconstructed from the sequence of recorded vector fields. The large out-of-plane motion in this configuration puts a strong constraint on the recorded particle displacements, which limits the measurement accuracy. The light sheet thickness becomes an important parameter that determines the balance between the spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. It is further demonstrated that so-called registration errors, which result from a small misalignment between the laser light sheet and the calibration target, easily become the predominant error in SPIV measurements. Measurements in laminar and turbulent pipe flow are compared to well established direct numerical simulations, and the accuracy of the instantaneous velocity vectors is found to be better than 1% of the mean axial velocity. This is sufficient to resolve the secondary flow patterns in transitional pipe flow, which are an order of magnitude smaller than the mean flow. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experiments in Fluids Springer Journals

Measurement of laminar, transitional and turbulent pipe flow using Stereoscopic-PIV

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Engineering; Engineering Fluid Dynamics; Fluid- and Aerodynamics; Engineering Thermodynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
ISSN
0723-4864
eISSN
1432-1114
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00348-006-0235-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) is applied to measure the instantaneous three component velocity field of pipe flow over the full circular cross-section of the pipe. The light sheet is oriented perpendicular to the main flow direction, and therefore the flow structures are advected through the measurement plane by the mean flow. Applying Taylor’s hypothesis, the 3D flow field is reconstructed from the sequence of recorded vector fields. The large out-of-plane motion in this configuration puts a strong constraint on the recorded particle displacements, which limits the measurement accuracy. The light sheet thickness becomes an important parameter that determines the balance between the spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. It is further demonstrated that so-called registration errors, which result from a small misalignment between the laser light sheet and the calibration target, easily become the predominant error in SPIV measurements. Measurements in laminar and turbulent pipe flow are compared to well established direct numerical simulations, and the accuracy of the instantaneous velocity vectors is found to be better than 1% of the mean axial velocity. This is sufficient to resolve the secondary flow patterns in transitional pipe flow, which are an order of magnitude smaller than the mean flow.

Journal

Experiments in FluidsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 8, 2006

References

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