Measurement of flow separation in a human vocal folds model

Measurement of flow separation in a human vocal folds model The paper provides experimental data on flow separation from a model of the human vocal folds. Data were measured on a four times scaled physical model, where one vocal fold was fixed and the other oscillated due to fluid–structure interaction. The vocal folds were fabricated from silicone rubber and placed on elastic support in the wall of a transparent wind tunnel. A PIV system was used to visualize the flow fields immediately downstream of the glottis and to measure the velocity fields. From the visualizations, the position of the flow separation point was evaluated using a semiautomatic procedure and plotted for different airflow velocities. The separation point position was quantified relative to the orifice width separately for the left and right vocal folds to account for flow asymmetry. The results indicate that the flow separation point remains close to the narrowest cross-section during most of the vocal fold vibration cycle, but moves significantly further downstream shortly prior to and after glottal closure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experiments in Fluids Springer Journals

Measurement of flow separation in a human vocal folds model

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Engineering; Fluid- and Aerodynamics; Engineering Fluid Dynamics; Engineering Thermodynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
ISSN
0723-4864
eISSN
1432-1114
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00348-010-1031-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paper provides experimental data on flow separation from a model of the human vocal folds. Data were measured on a four times scaled physical model, where one vocal fold was fixed and the other oscillated due to fluid–structure interaction. The vocal folds were fabricated from silicone rubber and placed on elastic support in the wall of a transparent wind tunnel. A PIV system was used to visualize the flow fields immediately downstream of the glottis and to measure the velocity fields. From the visualizations, the position of the flow separation point was evaluated using a semiautomatic procedure and plotted for different airflow velocities. The separation point position was quantified relative to the orifice width separately for the left and right vocal folds to account for flow asymmetry. The results indicate that the flow separation point remains close to the narrowest cross-section during most of the vocal fold vibration cycle, but moves significantly further downstream shortly prior to and after glottal closure.

Journal

Experiments in FluidsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 7, 2011

References

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