Masculinities, the Metrosexual, and Media Images: Across Dimensions of Age and Ethnicity

Masculinities, the Metrosexual, and Media Images: Across Dimensions of Age and Ethnicity By inviting two generations of ethnically diverse men to define masculinity, this study makes visible ways men conform to, negotiate, and resist forces of hegemonic masculinity in the 21st century. Masculine gender role conflict theory provides underpinning for a textual analysis of empirical evidence gathered among U.S. young college men (N = 80) in focus groups and their fathers/uncles (N = 27) during interviews. Findings suggest that masculinities predominantly are defined in non-physical terms. Perspectives offered by African-American/Black, Asian, Caucasian/White, and Hispanic/Latino men offer nuanced cross-cultural constructions and meanings of masculinities and influences that shape their sense of self. Reported overall was anxiety, confusion, and frustration—especially with regard to the metrosexual and (in)ability to measure up to media-promoted male body images. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Masculinities, the Metrosexual, and Media Images: Across Dimensions of Age and Ethnicity

Sex Roles , Volume 63 (10) – Nov 16, 2010

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-010-9870-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By inviting two generations of ethnically diverse men to define masculinity, this study makes visible ways men conform to, negotiate, and resist forces of hegemonic masculinity in the 21st century. Masculine gender role conflict theory provides underpinning for a textual analysis of empirical evidence gathered among U.S. young college men (N = 80) in focus groups and their fathers/uncles (N = 27) during interviews. Findings suggest that masculinities predominantly are defined in non-physical terms. Perspectives offered by African-American/Black, Asian, Caucasian/White, and Hispanic/Latino men offer nuanced cross-cultural constructions and meanings of masculinities and influences that shape their sense of self. Reported overall was anxiety, confusion, and frustration—especially with regard to the metrosexual and (in)ability to measure up to media-promoted male body images.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 16, 2010

References

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