Marine reserves and the complexity of larval dispersal

Marine reserves and the complexity of larval dispersal Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 10: 515–518, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Point of view Ilona C. Stobutzki CSIRO Marine Research, P.O. Box 120, Cleveland, QLD 4163, Australia (E-mail: ilona.stobtuzki@ marine.csiro.au) Accepted 27 January 2001 An increasing number of marine reserves have been larly the role of active larval behaviour in determining established, worldwide, with a range of different dispersal patterns. objectives (Jones, 1994). Initially many reserves were Any reserve, regardless of the reasons for its estab- established to preserve areas of particular conserva- lishment, must be able to sustain the populations of tion interest or to protect certain species (Björklund, organisms within the reserve. In reserves established 1981): objectives similar to those behind most ter- to enable the recovery of stocks, there is also an restrial reserves. However, the life cycle of marine assumption that there will be an increase in popu- organisms may enable marine reserves to fulfil dif- lation size (Jennings, 2000). If the populations out- ferent objectives to those of terrestrial reserves. In side the reserve are heavily exploited, the population terrestrial reserves, typically the early life stages of within the reserve may need to be self-seeding, as most http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Marine reserves and the complexity of larval dispersal

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1012241618520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 10: 515–518, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Point of view Ilona C. Stobutzki CSIRO Marine Research, P.O. Box 120, Cleveland, QLD 4163, Australia (E-mail: ilona.stobtuzki@ marine.csiro.au) Accepted 27 January 2001 An increasing number of marine reserves have been larly the role of active larval behaviour in determining established, worldwide, with a range of different dispersal patterns. objectives (Jones, 1994). Initially many reserves were Any reserve, regardless of the reasons for its estab- established to preserve areas of particular conserva- lishment, must be able to sustain the populations of tion interest or to protect certain species (Björklund, organisms within the reserve. In reserves established 1981): objectives similar to those behind most ter- to enable the recovery of stocks, there is also an restrial reserves. However, the life cycle of marine assumption that there will be an increase in popu- organisms may enable marine reserves to fulfil dif- lation size (Jennings, 2000). If the populations out- ferent objectives to those of terrestrial reserves. In side the reserve are heavily exploited, the population terrestrial reserves, typically the early life stages of within the reserve may need to be self-seeding, as most

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 8, 2004

References

  • Marine reserves are necessary but not sufficient for marine conservation
    Allison, G.W.; Lubchenco, J.; Carr, M.H.

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