Management of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES): Current Approach and Future Needs

Management of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES): Current Approach and Future Needs Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE, cell-mediated food allergic gastrointestinal disorder triggered by ingestion of food proteins (cow milk, soy, rice, oat, egg, and others). The acute FPIES begins approximately 1–4 h after food ingestion with profuse, repetitive emesis that is accompanied by lethargy and pallor and may be followed later by diarrhea; 15% will require hospitalization because of hypotension and hemodynamic instability due to severe dehydration. A chronic FPIES is less frequent and develops from few days to 4 weeks after the offending food has been introduced and fed daily. Chronic FPIES presents with intermittent emesis, bloody diarrhea, dehydration, weight loss, and failure to thrive and has been only reported in young infants fed with cow’s milk and soy-based formulas. Acute FPIES to seafood has been reported in older children and in adults. The majority of patients react to a single food; however, FPIES can be triggered by more than one food, especially between cow milk/soy and rice/oats. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Treatment Options in Allergy Springer Journals

Management of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES): Current Approach and Future Needs

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Allergology; General Practice / Family Medicine
eISSN
2196-3053
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40521-017-0141-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE, cell-mediated food allergic gastrointestinal disorder triggered by ingestion of food proteins (cow milk, soy, rice, oat, egg, and others). The acute FPIES begins approximately 1–4 h after food ingestion with profuse, repetitive emesis that is accompanied by lethargy and pallor and may be followed later by diarrhea; 15% will require hospitalization because of hypotension and hemodynamic instability due to severe dehydration. A chronic FPIES is less frequent and develops from few days to 4 weeks after the offending food has been introduced and fed daily. Chronic FPIES presents with intermittent emesis, bloody diarrhea, dehydration, weight loss, and failure to thrive and has been only reported in young infants fed with cow’s milk and soy-based formulas. Acute FPIES to seafood has been reported in older children and in adults. The majority of patients react to a single food; however, FPIES can be triggered by more than one food, especially between cow milk/soy and rice/oats.

Journal

Current Treatment Options in AllergySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 9, 2017

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