Male-Male Advising Relationships in Graduate Psychology: A Diminishing Dyad

Male-Male Advising Relationships in Graduate Psychology: A Diminishing Dyad In this article, we seek to advance the study of vocational gender dynamics by exploring a profession in the midst of a marked shift in gender composition – applied professional psychology. Although this field has historically been dominated by men, the ratio of men to women has drastically shifted (Levant 2011; Willyard 2011). It is within this vocational context that we examine the interplay between masculinity and applied psychological training; specifically, within the student-professional relationships formed by males in U.S. graduate psychology programs. Towards this larger goal, we present a review of existing literature. All studies included in this review are based on U.S. samples unless otherwise noted. We begin with a review of established masculine constructs, and highlight research that has examined these among men working or training within the field of mental health. Next, we present research on student-professional relationships, paying specific attention to studies on advising within applied psychology programs. With this literature review in tow, we discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of the all-male advisory dyad; these considerations are inclusive to dual theoretical conceptualizations of masculine identity (i.e., deficit model, positivistic model). We also addresses issues that may be raised by multiple cultural identities within these relationships (e.g., race, sexual orientation) with the support of research related to intersectionality. Finally, implications for training, as well as suggestions for future research are offered. Among other conclusions, we assert that applied psychology advisors, and their graduate programs more broadly, attend to aspects of masculinity during training. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Male-Male Advising Relationships in Graduate Psychology: A Diminishing Dyad

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-015-0466-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, we seek to advance the study of vocational gender dynamics by exploring a profession in the midst of a marked shift in gender composition – applied professional psychology. Although this field has historically been dominated by men, the ratio of men to women has drastically shifted (Levant 2011; Willyard 2011). It is within this vocational context that we examine the interplay between masculinity and applied psychological training; specifically, within the student-professional relationships formed by males in U.S. graduate psychology programs. Towards this larger goal, we present a review of existing literature. All studies included in this review are based on U.S. samples unless otherwise noted. We begin with a review of established masculine constructs, and highlight research that has examined these among men working or training within the field of mental health. Next, we present research on student-professional relationships, paying specific attention to studies on advising within applied psychology programs. With this literature review in tow, we discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of the all-male advisory dyad; these considerations are inclusive to dual theoretical conceptualizations of masculine identity (i.e., deficit model, positivistic model). We also addresses issues that may be raised by multiple cultural identities within these relationships (e.g., race, sexual orientation) with the support of research related to intersectionality. Finally, implications for training, as well as suggestions for future research are offered. Among other conclusions, we assert that applied psychology advisors, and their graduate programs more broadly, attend to aspects of masculinity during training.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2015

References

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