Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus Induces Changes in Host Plant Volatiles that Attract Vector Thrips Species

Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus Induces Changes in Host Plant Volatiles that Attract Vector Thrips... Maize lethal necrosis is one of the most devastating diseases of maize causing yield losses reaching up to 90% in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by a combination of maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) and any one of cereal viruses in the Potyviridae group such as sugarcane mosaic virus. MCMV has been reported to be transmitted mainly by maize thrips (Frankliniella williamsi) and onion thrips (Thrips tabaci). To better understand the role of thrips vectors in the epidemiology of the disease, we investigated behavioral responses of F. williamsi and T. tabaci, to volatiles collected from maize seedlings infected with MCMV in a four-arm olfactometer bioassay. Volatile profiles from MCMV-infected and healthy maize plants were compared by gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled mass spectrometry analyses. In the bioassays, both sexes of F. williamsi and male T. tabaci were significantly attracted to volatiles from maize plants infected with MCMV compared to healthy plants and solvent controls. Moreover, volatile analysis revealed strong induction of (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene in MCMV-infected maize seedlings. Our findings demonstrate MCMV induces changes in volatile profiles of host plants to elicit attraction of thrips vectors. The increased vector contact rates with MCMV-infected host plants could enhance virus transmission if thrips feed on the infected plants and acquire the pathogen prior to dispersal. Uncovering the mechanisms mediating interactions between vectors, host plants and pathogens provides useful insights for understanding the vector ecology and disease epidemiology, which in turn may contribute in designing integrated vector management strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Chemical Ecology Springer Journals

Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus Induces Changes in Host Plant Volatiles that Attract Vector Thrips Species

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Biochemistry, general; Entomology; Biological Microscopy; Agriculture
ISSN
0098-0331
eISSN
1573-1561
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10886-018-0973-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maize lethal necrosis is one of the most devastating diseases of maize causing yield losses reaching up to 90% in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by a combination of maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) and any one of cereal viruses in the Potyviridae group such as sugarcane mosaic virus. MCMV has been reported to be transmitted mainly by maize thrips (Frankliniella williamsi) and onion thrips (Thrips tabaci). To better understand the role of thrips vectors in the epidemiology of the disease, we investigated behavioral responses of F. williamsi and T. tabaci, to volatiles collected from maize seedlings infected with MCMV in a four-arm olfactometer bioassay. Volatile profiles from MCMV-infected and healthy maize plants were compared by gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled mass spectrometry analyses. In the bioassays, both sexes of F. williamsi and male T. tabaci were significantly attracted to volatiles from maize plants infected with MCMV compared to healthy plants and solvent controls. Moreover, volatile analysis revealed strong induction of (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene in MCMV-infected maize seedlings. Our findings demonstrate MCMV induces changes in volatile profiles of host plants to elicit attraction of thrips vectors. The increased vector contact rates with MCMV-infected host plants could enhance virus transmission if thrips feed on the infected plants and acquire the pathogen prior to dispersal. Uncovering the mechanisms mediating interactions between vectors, host plants and pathogens provides useful insights for understanding the vector ecology and disease epidemiology, which in turn may contribute in designing integrated vector management strategies.

Journal

Journal of Chemical EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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