Long-term trends in ambient particulate matter, chemical composition, and associated health risk and mortality burden in Hong Kong (1995–2016)

Long-term trends in ambient particulate matter, chemical composition, and associated health risk... Hong Kong is one of the special administrative regions in China and a densely populated city with poor air quality. The impact of high pollutant concentrations, especially ambient particulate matter (PM), on human health is of major concern. This study reported the temporal trends of PM masses and chemical components and assessed the PM pollution-related health risk and mortality burden in Hong Kong over a 22-year period (1995–2016). The results showed that the ambient PM increased before 2005 and then decreased gradually with overall downward trends of − 0.61 μg m−3 year−1 for inhalable PM (PM10) and − 1.30 μg m−3 year−1 for fine PM (PM2.5). No statistically significant changes were observed for secondary inorganic components (SO4 2−, NO3 −, and NH4 +), while significant decreasing trends were found for total carbon (TC) and other water-soluble irons (Na+, Cl−, and K+). The long-term variabilities of the trace elements differed greatly with species. A health risk assessment revealed that the annual inhalational carcinogenic risk from As, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb was always lower than the accepted criterion of 10−6, whereas the total noncarcinogenic risk from As, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Mn frequently exceeded the safe level of 1. Further, a health burden assessment indicated that the annual mean number of premature mortalities attributable to PM2.5 exposure was 2918 (95% CI: 1288, 4279) cases during the period of 2001–2016. Both health risk and mortality burden presented constant reductions in recent years, confirming the health benefits of air pollution control measures and the importance of further mitigation efforts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health Springer Journals

Long-term trends in ambient particulate matter, chemical composition, and associated health risk and mortality burden in Hong Kong (1995–2016)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/long-term-trends-in-ambient-particulate-matter-chemical-composition-mgLJzYRnVB
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
ISSN
1873-9318
eISSN
1873-9326
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11869-018-0591-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hong Kong is one of the special administrative regions in China and a densely populated city with poor air quality. The impact of high pollutant concentrations, especially ambient particulate matter (PM), on human health is of major concern. This study reported the temporal trends of PM masses and chemical components and assessed the PM pollution-related health risk and mortality burden in Hong Kong over a 22-year period (1995–2016). The results showed that the ambient PM increased before 2005 and then decreased gradually with overall downward trends of − 0.61 μg m−3 year−1 for inhalable PM (PM10) and − 1.30 μg m−3 year−1 for fine PM (PM2.5). No statistically significant changes were observed for secondary inorganic components (SO4 2−, NO3 −, and NH4 +), while significant decreasing trends were found for total carbon (TC) and other water-soluble irons (Na+, Cl−, and K+). The long-term variabilities of the trace elements differed greatly with species. A health risk assessment revealed that the annual inhalational carcinogenic risk from As, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb was always lower than the accepted criterion of 10−6, whereas the total noncarcinogenic risk from As, Cd, Ni, Cr, and Mn frequently exceeded the safe level of 1. Further, a health burden assessment indicated that the annual mean number of premature mortalities attributable to PM2.5 exposure was 2918 (95% CI: 1288, 4279) cases during the period of 2001–2016. Both health risk and mortality burden presented constant reductions in recent years, confirming the health benefits of air pollution control measures and the importance of further mitigation efforts.

Journal

Air Quality, Atmosphere & HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off