Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues

Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish... Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2017) 71:108 DOI 10.1007/s00265-017-2337-x ORIGINAL ARTICLE Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues 1 2,3 3,4 Josefin Sundin & Mirjam Amcoff & Fernando Mateos-González & 5,6 7 5,8 Graham D. Raby & Fredrik Jutfelt & Timothy D. Clark Received: 28 February 2017 /Revised: 8 June 2017 /Accepted: 14 June 2017 The Author(s) 2017. This article is an open access publication Abstract seawater-containing predator chemical cues. There was Levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO ) projected to oc- no effect of CO treatment on routine activity levels before 2 2 cur in the world’s oceans in the near future have been or after the injections. All fish decreased their swimming reported to increase swimming activity and impair predator activity following the predator cue injection but not fol- recognition in coral reef fishes. These behavioral alter- lowing the sham injection, regardless of CO treatment. ations would be expected to have dramatic effects on sur- Our results corroborate findings from a growing number vival and community dynamics in marine ecosystems in of studies reporting limited or no behavioral responses of the future. To investigate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Springer Journals

Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Zoology; Animal Ecology
ISSN
0340-5443
eISSN
1432-0762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00265-017-2337-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2017) 71:108 DOI 10.1007/s00265-017-2337-x ORIGINAL ARTICLE Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues 1 2,3 3,4 Josefin Sundin & Mirjam Amcoff & Fernando Mateos-González & 5,6 7 5,8 Graham D. Raby & Fredrik Jutfelt & Timothy D. Clark Received: 28 February 2017 /Revised: 8 June 2017 /Accepted: 14 June 2017 The Author(s) 2017. This article is an open access publication Abstract seawater-containing predator chemical cues. There was Levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO ) projected to oc- no effect of CO treatment on routine activity levels before 2 2 cur in the world’s oceans in the near future have been or after the injections. All fish decreased their swimming reported to increase swimming activity and impair predator activity following the predator cue injection but not fol- recognition in coral reef fishes. These behavioral alter- lowing the sham injection, regardless of CO treatment. ations would be expected to have dramatic effects on sur- Our results corroborate findings from a growing number vival and community dynamics in marine ecosystems in of studies reporting limited or no behavioral responses of the future. To investigate

Journal

Behavioral Ecology and SociobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 5, 2017

References

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