Long-Lasting Dysphagia Developing After Thoracotomy for Pulmonary Resection: a Case Series

Long-Lasting Dysphagia Developing After Thoracotomy for Pulmonary Resection: a Case Series The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the severity and the characteristics of dysphagia using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) in long-lasting dysphagia patients developing after thoracotomy performed for pulmonary resection. Eleven patients (10 men and 1 woman, average age 67 ± 6.6 years; the average operation time in the patients was 507 min) were selected from among patients who developed dysphagia after undergoing thoracotomy for pulmonary resection between January 2009 and December 2012. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) at 1 month postoperatively was used as a representative of parameters examined by the VFSS. The score on the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) was determined to evaluate the swallowing capacity at 1 and 3 months postoperatively. Most of the patients showed improvement of FOIS score at 3 months postoperatively. The patients showed mainly pharyngeal dysfunction. In spite of preserving the swallowing reflex, abnormalities of the residue in the vallecula and pyriform sinus and penetration were relatively frequent. Perioperative factors (age, %VC, FEV1.0 %, operation time, length of ICU stay) and FOIS were investigated to determine their relationships with the VDS score. While it showed no relationship with the age, lung function, operation time, and length of ICU stay, the VDS score was found to be significantly associated with the FOIS score at 3 months postoperatively. Evaluation by VFSS after lung surgery is useful to predict the prognosis of swallowing difficulty. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Indian Journal of Surgery Springer Journals

Long-Lasting Dysphagia Developing After Thoracotomy for Pulmonary Resection: a Case Series

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/long-lasting-dysphagia-developing-after-thoracotomy-for-pulmonary-YLl5u0EhEz
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Association of Surgeons of India
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Surgery; Pediatric Surgery; Neurosurgery; Plastic Surgery; Cardiac Surgery; Thoracic Surgery
ISSN
0972-2068
eISSN
0973-9793
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12262-016-1504-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the severity and the characteristics of dysphagia using videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) in long-lasting dysphagia patients developing after thoracotomy performed for pulmonary resection. Eleven patients (10 men and 1 woman, average age 67 ± 6.6 years; the average operation time in the patients was 507 min) were selected from among patients who developed dysphagia after undergoing thoracotomy for pulmonary resection between January 2009 and December 2012. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) at 1 month postoperatively was used as a representative of parameters examined by the VFSS. The score on the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) was determined to evaluate the swallowing capacity at 1 and 3 months postoperatively. Most of the patients showed improvement of FOIS score at 3 months postoperatively. The patients showed mainly pharyngeal dysfunction. In spite of preserving the swallowing reflex, abnormalities of the residue in the vallecula and pyriform sinus and penetration were relatively frequent. Perioperative factors (age, %VC, FEV1.0 %, operation time, length of ICU stay) and FOIS were investigated to determine their relationships with the VDS score. While it showed no relationship with the age, lung function, operation time, and length of ICU stay, the VDS score was found to be significantly associated with the FOIS score at 3 months postoperatively. Evaluation by VFSS after lung surgery is useful to predict the prognosis of swallowing difficulty.

Journal

Indian Journal of SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: May 7, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off