Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Lisdexamfetamine/methylphenidate

Lisdexamfetamine/methylphenidate Reactions 1704, p229 - 2 Jun 2018 Various toxicities: case report An 11-year-old girl developed tolerance to methylphenidate [Concerta] and lisdexamfetamine. She experienced withdrawal symptoms, which included vomiting, headaches and marked sensitivity to bright lights after discontinuation of methylphenidate. She also developed migraines and malaise after dose reduction of lisdexamfetamine. Additionally, she experienced irritability and skin picking due to lisdexamfetamine [routes, indications, durations of treatments to reaction onsets not stated; not all dosages and outcomes stated]. The girl presented with marked irritability, excessive reactivity to frustration, prominent skin picking, persistent impairment due to inattention and social difficulties. She had autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a learning disability, and was receiving lisdexamfetamine 50 mg/day along with guanfacine and fluoxetine. Her parents reported that she experienced severe episode of vomiting, headaches and marked sensitivity to bright lights after abrupt discontinuation of an osmotic controlled release preparation of methylphenidate 36mg, which lasted for several days. At the time of her initial consultation, her interactions with the examiner were somewhat elusive. She admitted that the eye contact with other persons was difficult; hence, she preferred to look away. She could effectively use the language for sharing thoughts, but she http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reactions Weekly Springer Journals

Lisdexamfetamine/methylphenidate

Reactions Weekly , Volume 1704 (1) – Jun 2, 2018

Lisdexamfetamine/methylphenidate

Abstract

Reactions 1704, p229 - 2 Jun 2018 Various toxicities: case report An 11-year-old girl developed tolerance to methylphenidate [Concerta] and lisdexamfetamine. She experienced withdrawal symptoms, which included vomiting, headaches and marked sensitivity to bright lights after discontinuation of methylphenidate. She also developed migraines and malaise after dose reduction of lisdexamfetamine. Additionally, she experienced irritability and skin picking due to lisdexamfetamine [routes,...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/lisdexamfetamine-methylphenidate-qpL1u6dWBB

References (1)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance; Pharmacology/Toxicology
ISSN
0114-9954
eISSN
1179-2051
DOI
10.1007/s40278-018-46872-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactions 1704, p229 - 2 Jun 2018 Various toxicities: case report An 11-year-old girl developed tolerance to methylphenidate [Concerta] and lisdexamfetamine. She experienced withdrawal symptoms, which included vomiting, headaches and marked sensitivity to bright lights after discontinuation of methylphenidate. She also developed migraines and malaise after dose reduction of lisdexamfetamine. Additionally, she experienced irritability and skin picking due to lisdexamfetamine [routes, indications, durations of treatments to reaction onsets not stated; not all dosages and outcomes stated]. The girl presented with marked irritability, excessive reactivity to frustration, prominent skin picking, persistent impairment due to inattention and social difficulties. She had autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a learning disability, and was receiving lisdexamfetamine 50 mg/day along with guanfacine and fluoxetine. Her parents reported that she experienced severe episode of vomiting, headaches and marked sensitivity to bright lights after abrupt discontinuation of an osmotic controlled release preparation of methylphenidate 36mg, which lasted for several days. At the time of her initial consultation, her interactions with the examiner were somewhat elusive. She admitted that the eye contact with other persons was difficult; hence, she preferred to look away. She could effectively use the language for sharing thoughts, but she

Journal

Reactions WeeklySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

There are no references for this article.