Linking population genetics and growth properties of Atlantic cod

Linking population genetics and growth properties of Atlantic cod It is strongly implicated that cod in the NorthAtlantic Ocean is sub-structured at a smallgeographic scale exemplified by studies fromCanadian, Icelandic, and Norwegian waters. Inthe first part of this review, we reviewedpopulation genetics studies in these threeareas and our conclusion is that, despite someinconsistencies in the numerous genetic studiesof cod in Norwegian and Icelandic waters, andthe northwest Atlantic, these studiesillustrate that cod in the investigated areasconsists of several distinct populations, bothwithin and between areas. However, tounderstand the contradictory results obtainedin some of the studies discussed in thisreview, more knowledge about the influence ofnatural selection, mutation, and genetic drifton the genetic material of cod is necessary.Such knowledge could guide us to the markersgiving the best illustration of the geneticstructure in these areas. Identifying andgenetically characterizing wild stocks areessential steps for their conservation, sinceoverexploitation of genetically differentpopulations can lead to the loss of geneticvariability and productivity in subsequentgenerations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Linking population genetics and growth properties of Atlantic cod

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/linking-population-genetics-and-growth-properties-of-atlantic-cod-G0VOLBq69s
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1026373509576
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is strongly implicated that cod in the NorthAtlantic Ocean is sub-structured at a smallgeographic scale exemplified by studies fromCanadian, Icelandic, and Norwegian waters. Inthe first part of this review, we reviewedpopulation genetics studies in these threeareas and our conclusion is that, despite someinconsistencies in the numerous genetic studiesof cod in Norwegian and Icelandic waters, andthe northwest Atlantic, these studiesillustrate that cod in the investigated areasconsists of several distinct populations, bothwithin and between areas. However, tounderstand the contradictory results obtainedin some of the studies discussed in thisreview, more knowledge about the influence ofnatural selection, mutation, and genetic drifton the genetic material of cod is necessary.Such knowledge could guide us to the markersgiving the best illustration of the geneticstructure in these areas. Identifying andgenetically characterizing wild stocks areessential steps for their conservation, sinceoverexploitation of genetically differentpopulations can lead to the loss of geneticvariability and productivity in subsequentgenerations.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 4, 2004

References

  • Heteroplasmy of short tandem repeats in mitochondrial DNA of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua
    Árnason, E.; Rand, D.M.
  • Gene flow and lack of population differentiation in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., from Iceland, and comparison of cod from Norway and Newfoundland
    Árnason, E.; Pálsson, S.; Arason, A.
  • Mitochondrial cytochrome b DNA sequence variation of Atlantic cod from Iceland and Greenland
    Árnason, E.; Petersen, P.H.; Kristinsson, K.; Sigurgíslason, H.; Pálsson, S.
  • Multiple stock structure of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) off Newfoundland and Labrador determined from genetic variation
    Beacham, T.D.; Brattey, J.; Miller, K.M.; Le, K.D.; Withler, R.E.
  • Designing aquaculture mass selection programs to avoid high inbreeding rates
    Bentsen, H.B.; Olesen, I.
  • Optimal temperature for growth and feed conversion of immature cod (Gadus morhua L.)
    Björnsson, B.; Steinarsson, A.; Oddgeirsson, M.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off