Life-history characteristics of eleotrid fishes of the western hemisphere, and perils of life in a vanishing environment

Life-history characteristics of eleotrid fishes of the western hemisphere, and perils of life in... The term amphidromous was coined (Myers in Copeia 1949:89–97, 1949b) to describe diadromous life histories that include migrations, not associated with reproduction, that are between fresh and marine waters. This concept has facilitated evaluations of life cycles among a number of groups of fishes including some belonging to the family Eleotridae. Information was gathered on life history patterns of eleotrid fish species that have been recorded from both fresh and brackish or marine waters of the east and west coasts of North, Middle, and South America, including adjacent islands, seeking evidence of diadromy and especially of amphidromy. Convincing evidence was found of diadromy in the life cycles of four species from the east coast (with another two species possibly in this category), and of three species from the west coast of the Americas and adjacent islands. However, there was convincing evidence of amphidromy in only one species from the east coast and adjacent islands, with another three species or species populations possibly in this category, and in three species from the west coast and adjacent islands. It seems possible from the available information that there may be variation among populations in life cycles of some of these species. However, it remains for the use of modern techniques to allow more definitive determinations of life history patterns of these eleotrid species populations. Serious concern exists with respect to the conservation of all diadromous species because of the worldwide emphasis on river manipulations, especially of dam construction. Resident diadromous organisms are being impeded in their migrations, and thus imperiled in their potential for survival, depending on the nature of river alterations and the abilities of the organisms to cope with them. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Life-history characteristics of eleotrid fishes of the western hemisphere, and perils of life in a vanishing environment

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-011-9229-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The term amphidromous was coined (Myers in Copeia 1949:89–97, 1949b) to describe diadromous life histories that include migrations, not associated with reproduction, that are between fresh and marine waters. This concept has facilitated evaluations of life cycles among a number of groups of fishes including some belonging to the family Eleotridae. Information was gathered on life history patterns of eleotrid fish species that have been recorded from both fresh and brackish or marine waters of the east and west coasts of North, Middle, and South America, including adjacent islands, seeking evidence of diadromy and especially of amphidromy. Convincing evidence was found of diadromy in the life cycles of four species from the east coast (with another two species possibly in this category), and of three species from the west coast of the Americas and adjacent islands. However, there was convincing evidence of amphidromy in only one species from the east coast and adjacent islands, with another three species or species populations possibly in this category, and in three species from the west coast and adjacent islands. It seems possible from the available information that there may be variation among populations in life cycles of some of these species. However, it remains for the use of modern techniques to allow more definitive determinations of life history patterns of these eleotrid species populations. Serious concern exists with respect to the conservation of all diadromous species because of the worldwide emphasis on river manipulations, especially of dam construction. Resident diadromous organisms are being impeded in their migrations, and thus imperiled in their potential for survival, depending on the nature of river alterations and the abilities of the organisms to cope with them.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 12, 2011

References

  • Ecological consequences of hydropower development in Central America: impacts of small dams and water diversion on neotropical stream fish assemblages
    Anderson, EP; Freeman, MC; Pringle, CM
  • Diet overlap between native bigmouth sleepers (Gobiomorus dormitor) and introduced predatory fishes in a Puerto Rico reservoir
    Bacheler, NM; Neal, JW; Noble, RL

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