Lack of restriction of growth for aquareovirus in mammalian cells

Lack of restriction of growth for aquareovirus in mammalian cells The striped bass (SBR) virus, a member of the recently described aquareoviruses, infected, caused cytopathic effects (CPE), and replicated in mammalian cells. The virus caused CPE in all 7 of the mammalian cell lines investigated. SBR virus functioned best at lower temperatures and it is these lower temperatures that appeared to be restricting factors for growth of some mammalian cells. At 22 °C the SBR virus grew to similar titers in both chinook salmon embryo (CHSE) cells and in mammalian cells. Analysis of viral polypeptide and RNA synthesis suggests that the restriction for viral growth at higher temperatures occurs after adsorption but before transcription and translation of viral genes. The fact that SBR virus did not grow at 37 °C implies that aquareo- viruses are unlikely to be human pathogens. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Lack of restriction of growth for aquareovirus in mammalian cells

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © Wien by 1998 Springer-Verlag/
Subject
Legacy
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s007050050313
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The striped bass (SBR) virus, a member of the recently described aquareoviruses, infected, caused cytopathic effects (CPE), and replicated in mammalian cells. The virus caused CPE in all 7 of the mammalian cell lines investigated. SBR virus functioned best at lower temperatures and it is these lower temperatures that appeared to be restricting factors for growth of some mammalian cells. At 22 °C the SBR virus grew to similar titers in both chinook salmon embryo (CHSE) cells and in mammalian cells. Analysis of viral polypeptide and RNA synthesis suggests that the restriction for viral growth at higher temperatures occurs after adsorption but before transcription and translation of viral genes. The fact that SBR virus did not grow at 37 °C implies that aquareo- viruses are unlikely to be human pathogens.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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