Laccase Production and Humic Acids Decomposition by Microscopic Soil Fungi

Laccase Production and Humic Acids Decomposition by Microscopic Soil Fungi Laccase (para-diphenol:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.10.3.2) is a phenol oxidase widespread in fungi and bacteria. In basidiomycetes, this enzyme is involved in the transformation of lignin and humic substances (HS) in soil. The role of laccases of soil ascomycetes and deuteromycetes in HS degradation is not established, and conditions of the enzyme production have been poorly studied. In the present work soil micromycetes, potential laccase producers, were isolated from typical soils of the forest, steppe, and foreststeppe zones of European Russia by plating on agar media with ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulphonic acid, sodium salt)) as the substrate. Their abundance, species composition, conditions of laccase production, and its relation to humic acids (HA) degradation in liquid and solid media were studied. Out of 68 strains isolated, 20 exhibited ABTS oxidation at initial plating on agar media. In pure cultures on agar media, oxidation was less pronounced, but in the presence of HA laccase production by some strains was higher than without HA. Significant and weak extracellular laccase production in liquid medium was observed for Acremonium murorum (Corda) W. Gams Z1710 and Botritis cinerea Pers. ex Fries Z1711, respectively. The level of laccase production by A. murorum was the same without inducers and in the presence of HA, while B. cinerea produced laccase only without inducers. No direct correlation was found between the presence of laccase and/or its activity and ability of the fungi to decolorize (degrade) HA. In liquid media active laccase producer A. murorum caused lower HA decolorization (43%) than B. cinerea (62%) and the fungi lacking extracellular laccase (54–81%). The role of micromycete oxidative systems in HA degradation requires further investigation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Microbiology Springer Journals

Laccase Production and Humic Acids Decomposition by Microscopic Soil Fungi

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Medical Microbiology
ISSN
0026-2617
eISSN
1608-3237
D.O.I.
10.1134/S0026261718030153
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Laccase (para-diphenol:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.10.3.2) is a phenol oxidase widespread in fungi and bacteria. In basidiomycetes, this enzyme is involved in the transformation of lignin and humic substances (HS) in soil. The role of laccases of soil ascomycetes and deuteromycetes in HS degradation is not established, and conditions of the enzyme production have been poorly studied. In the present work soil micromycetes, potential laccase producers, were isolated from typical soils of the forest, steppe, and foreststeppe zones of European Russia by plating on agar media with ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulphonic acid, sodium salt)) as the substrate. Their abundance, species composition, conditions of laccase production, and its relation to humic acids (HA) degradation in liquid and solid media were studied. Out of 68 strains isolated, 20 exhibited ABTS oxidation at initial plating on agar media. In pure cultures on agar media, oxidation was less pronounced, but in the presence of HA laccase production by some strains was higher than without HA. Significant and weak extracellular laccase production in liquid medium was observed for Acremonium murorum (Corda) W. Gams Z1710 and Botritis cinerea Pers. ex Fries Z1711, respectively. The level of laccase production by A. murorum was the same without inducers and in the presence of HA, while B. cinerea produced laccase only without inducers. No direct correlation was found between the presence of laccase and/or its activity and ability of the fungi to decolorize (degrade) HA. In liquid media active laccase producer A. murorum caused lower HA decolorization (43%) than B. cinerea (62%) and the fungi lacking extracellular laccase (54–81%). The role of micromycete oxidative systems in HA degradation requires further investigation.

Journal

MicrobiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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