Kinematics of ventrally mediated grasp-to-eat actions: right-hand advantage is dependent on dorsal stream input

Kinematics of ventrally mediated grasp-to-eat actions: right-hand advantage is dependent on... Studies have suggested a left-hemisphere specialization for visually guided grasp-to-eat actions by way of task-dependent kinematic asymmetries (i.e., smaller maximum grip apertures for right-handed grasp-to-eat movements than for right-handed grasp-to-place movements or left-handed movements of either type). It is unknown, however, whether this left-hemisphere/right-hand kinematic advantage is reliant on the dorsal “vision-for-action” visual stream. The present study investigates the kinematic differences between grasp-to-eat and grasp-to place actions performance during closed-loop (i.e., dorsally mediated) and open-loop delay (i.e., ventrally mediated) conditions. Twenty-one right-handed adult participants were asked to reach to grasp small food items to (1) eat them, or (2) place them in a container below the mouth. Grasps were performed in both closed-loop and open-loop delay conditions, in separate sessions. We show that participants displayed the right-hand grasp-to-eat kinematic advantage in the closed-loop condition, but not in the open-loop delay condition. As no task-dependent kinematic differences were found in ventrally mediated grasps, we posit that the left-hemisphere/right-hand advantage is dependent on dorsal stream processing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

Kinematics of ventrally mediated grasp-to-eat actions: right-hand advantage is dependent on dorsal stream input

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00221-018-5242-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Studies have suggested a left-hemisphere specialization for visually guided grasp-to-eat actions by way of task-dependent kinematic asymmetries (i.e., smaller maximum grip apertures for right-handed grasp-to-eat movements than for right-handed grasp-to-place movements or left-handed movements of either type). It is unknown, however, whether this left-hemisphere/right-hand kinematic advantage is reliant on the dorsal “vision-for-action” visual stream. The present study investigates the kinematic differences between grasp-to-eat and grasp-to place actions performance during closed-loop (i.e., dorsally mediated) and open-loop delay (i.e., ventrally mediated) conditions. Twenty-one right-handed adult participants were asked to reach to grasp small food items to (1) eat them, or (2) place them in a container below the mouth. Grasps were performed in both closed-loop and open-loop delay conditions, in separate sessions. We show that participants displayed the right-hand grasp-to-eat kinematic advantage in the closed-loop condition, but not in the open-loop delay condition. As no task-dependent kinematic differences were found in ventrally mediated grasps, we posit that the left-hemisphere/right-hand advantage is dependent on dorsal stream processing.

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 27, 2018

References

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