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Job Stress, Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment and Their Associations with Job Burnout Among Indian Police Officers: a Research Note

Job Stress, Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment and Their... Job burnout can negatively impact individual officers, the organization that employs the burned out officers, citizens with whom these officers directly interact, and the community more broadly. The vast majority of the empirical research on burnout has been based on Western police officers. The present study extends our understanding of the associations that job stress, job involvement, job satisfaction, affective commitment, and continuance commitment have with the three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a reduced sense of accomplishment) among Indian police officers. Ordinary least square (OLS) regression analysis was used to examine survey data from 827 police officers in the Sonipat and Rohtak districts of the Indian state of Haryana using a systematic random sample. The findings indicate that job involvement and job satisfaction were associated with lower levels of all three dimensions of burnout. Job stress was associated with emotional and reduced accomplishment burnout. High affective commitment was associated with lower levels of a reduced sense of personal accomplishment, while continuance commitment was associated with higher levels of emotional and depersonalization burnout. The results suggest that job stress, job involvement, job satisfaction, affective commitment, and continuance commitment have effects on burnout among Indian officers, as has been found among Western officers. As such, police scholars and administrators should focus on reducing job stress and continuance commitment and increasing job involvement, job satisfaction, and affective commitment among officers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology Springer Journals

Job Stress, Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment and Their Associations with Job Burnout Among Indian Police Officers: a Research Note

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References (93)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Society for Police and Criminal Psychology
Subject
Psychology; Psychology, general; Law and Psychology; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general
ISSN
0882-0783
eISSN
1936-6469
DOI
10.1007/s11896-017-9236-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Job burnout can negatively impact individual officers, the organization that employs the burned out officers, citizens with whom these officers directly interact, and the community more broadly. The vast majority of the empirical research on burnout has been based on Western police officers. The present study extends our understanding of the associations that job stress, job involvement, job satisfaction, affective commitment, and continuance commitment have with the three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a reduced sense of accomplishment) among Indian police officers. Ordinary least square (OLS) regression analysis was used to examine survey data from 827 police officers in the Sonipat and Rohtak districts of the Indian state of Haryana using a systematic random sample. The findings indicate that job involvement and job satisfaction were associated with lower levels of all three dimensions of burnout. Job stress was associated with emotional and reduced accomplishment burnout. High affective commitment was associated with lower levels of a reduced sense of personal accomplishment, while continuance commitment was associated with higher levels of emotional and depersonalization burnout. The results suggest that job stress, job involvement, job satisfaction, affective commitment, and continuance commitment have effects on burnout among Indian officers, as has been found among Western officers. As such, police scholars and administrators should focus on reducing job stress and continuance commitment and increasing job involvement, job satisfaction, and affective commitment among officers.

Journal

Journal of Police and Criminal PsychologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 17, 2017

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