James R. Otteson: The end of socialism

James R. Otteson: The end of socialism Rev Austrian Econ (2016) 29:331–335 DOI 10.1007/s11138-015-0299-7 New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2014. xiv + 224 Pages. $29.99 (paperback) Gerard Casey Published online: 29 January 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015 I first came across the work of James Otteson while rummaging in the bargain book section of Hodges Figgis’s bookshop in Dublin some years ago. His book Actual Ethics (Otteson 2006) was available at a spectacular discount and even though I hadn’tat the time heard of him, it seemed like a worthwhile speculative purchase. Never was money better spent! Here was someone who, beside myself (Casey 2012), thought that the ethical writings of Adam Smith were the greatest thing since sliced bread. Having finished Actual Ethics, I quickly purchased (at full price!) and read Otteson’s Adam Smith’s Marketplace of Life (Otteson 2002), a more directly interpretative account of the work of Smith but, once again, superbly written, engaging and insightful. Otteson’s latest book, which is written in a neo-Smithian vein, can be seen as a more or less indirect rejoinder to Gerry Cohen’s, Why Not Socialism? (Cohen 2009), one of a number of such works (Terry Eagleton’s(2011) Why Marx was Right is another) that sprouted up, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Review of Austrian Economics Springer Journals

James R. Otteson: The end of socialism

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Economics; Public Finance & Economics; Political Science; Methodology/History of Economic Thought
ISSN
0889-3047
eISSN
1573-7128
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11138-015-0299-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rev Austrian Econ (2016) 29:331–335 DOI 10.1007/s11138-015-0299-7 New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2014. xiv + 224 Pages. $29.99 (paperback) Gerard Casey Published online: 29 January 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015 I first came across the work of James Otteson while rummaging in the bargain book section of Hodges Figgis’s bookshop in Dublin some years ago. His book Actual Ethics (Otteson 2006) was available at a spectacular discount and even though I hadn’tat the time heard of him, it seemed like a worthwhile speculative purchase. Never was money better spent! Here was someone who, beside myself (Casey 2012), thought that the ethical writings of Adam Smith were the greatest thing since sliced bread. Having finished Actual Ethics, I quickly purchased (at full price!) and read Otteson’s Adam Smith’s Marketplace of Life (Otteson 2002), a more directly interpretative account of the work of Smith but, once again, superbly written, engaging and insightful. Otteson’s latest book, which is written in a neo-Smithian vein, can be seen as a more or less indirect rejoinder to Gerry Cohen’s, Why Not Socialism? (Cohen 2009), one of a number of such works (Terry Eagleton’s(2011) Why Marx was Right is another) that sprouted up,

Journal

The Review of Austrian EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 29, 2015

References

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